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The impact of pay on CEO turnover: A test of two perspectives

Author

Listed:
  • Shen, Wei
  • Gentry, Richard J.
  • Tosi Jr., Henry L.

Abstract

We investigate the impact of pay on CEO turnover from two perspectives. One is managerial power perspective that focuses on power in the setting of CEO pay. The other is tournament theory that treats CEO pay as a top prize designed to motivate executives to work hard for the top position. Building on research that highlights the impact of power dynamics at the top of the firm on CEO turnover, we propose that managerial power perspective suggests a negative impact of CEO pay on CEO turnover, while tournament theory suggests a positive impact. Using data from a sample of 313 large U.S. companies from 1988 to 1997, we find that both the level of CEO pay and its ratio over the average pay of the firm's four other highest paid executives have a negative impact on CEO turnover.

Suggested Citation

  • Shen, Wei & Gentry, Richard J. & Tosi Jr., Henry L., 2010. "The impact of pay on CEO turnover: A test of two perspectives," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 729-734, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:7:p:729-734
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wei Shi & Brian L. Connelly & Wm. Gerard Sanders, 2016. "Buying bad behavior: Tournament incentives and securities class action lawsuits," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(7), pages 1354-1378, July.
    2. Humphreys, Brad R. & Paul, Rodney J. & Weinbach, Andrew P., 2016. "Performance expectations and the tenure of head coaches: Evidence from NCAA football," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 482-492.
    3. Lerong He & Junxiong Fang, 2016. "Subnational institutional contingencies and executive pay dispersion," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 371-410, June.
    4. repec:eee:finana:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:38-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Park, Jong-Hun & Kim, Changsu & Sung, Yun-Dal, 2014. "Whom to dismiss? CEO celebrity and management dismissal," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 2346-2355.
    6. Humphreys, Brad & Paul, Rodney & Weinbach, Andrew, 2011. "CEO Turnover: More Evidence on the Role of Performance Expectations," Working Papers 2011-14, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.

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