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Exchange rate regimes, capital controls, and currency crises: Does the bipolar view hold?

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  • Esaka, Taro

Abstract

This paper empirically examines the link between de facto exchange rate regimes and the incidence of currency crises in 84 countries from 1980 to 2001 using probit models. We employ the de facto classification of Reinhart and Rogoff (2004) that allows us to estimate the impact of relatively long-lived exchange rate regimes on currency crises with much greater precision. We find no evidence that, as the bipolar view argues, intermediate regimes have a significantly higher probability of currency crises than both hard pegs and free floats. Using the combined data of exchange rate regimes and the existence of capital controls, we also find that hard pegs with capital account liberalization have a significantly lower probability of currency crises than intermediate regimes with capital controls and free floats with capital controls. Hence, the bipolar view does not strictly hold in the sense that intermediate regimes are significantly more prone to currency crises than the two extreme regimes. However, the fact that hard pegs with capital account liberalization are substantially less prone to currency crises is worthy of note.

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  • Esaka, Taro, 2010. "Exchange rate regimes, capital controls, and currency crises: Does the bipolar view hold?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 91-108, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:intfin:v:20:y:2010:i:1:p:91-108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexis CRUZ-RODRIGUEZ, 2016. "Exchange Arrangements and Currency Crises: What´s the matter with the exchange rate classification?," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 377-392, June.
    2. Abdilahi Ali & Katsushi S. Imai, 2015. "Editor's choice Crises, Economic Integration and Growth Collapses in African Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 24(4), pages 471-501.
    3. Giancarlo Marini & Giovanni Piersanti, 2012. "Models of Speculative Attacks and Crashes in International Capital Markets," CEIS Research Paper 245, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 24 Jul 2012.
    4. Cruz-Rodríguez, Alexis, 2016. "Exchange Arrangements and Speculative Attacks: Is there a link?," MPRA Paper 72359, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Mohammad Karimi & Marcel-Cristian Voia, 2011. "Currency Crises, Exchange Rate Regimes, and Capital Account Liberalization: A Duration Analysis Approach," Carleton Economic Papers 11-12, Carleton University, Department of Economics.

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