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Conceptual frameworks for comparing healthcare politics and policy

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  • Marmor, Theodore
  • Wendt, Claus

Abstract

This literature review pursues two main objectives: first, it argues that research on health policy actors and healthcare systems need to be separated more thoroughly. Though there are important interactions between both fields, it is often advisable to separate analytically research on health policy actors and on healthcare systems. Second, concentrating not only on actors and institutions but also on outcomes, we suggest, is theoretically valuable, practically feasible, and policy relevant. Most studies discussed in this review concentrate either on health policy implementation or on healthcare system characteristics. Our emphasis is on extending the understanding about the outcomes of different national healthcare arrangements and whether policy reforms actually deliver their promised results. To do this, more attention to the measurement of success is required.

Suggested Citation

  • Marmor, Theodore & Wendt, Claus, 2012. "Conceptual frameworks for comparing healthcare politics and policy," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 11-20.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:107:y:2012:i:1:p:11-20 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2012.06.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sundmacher, Leonie & Busse, Reinhard, 2011. "The impact of physician supply on avoidable cancer deaths in Germany. A spatial analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 53-62.
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10510 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nolte, Ellen & McKee, Martin, 2011. "Variations in amenable mortality—Trends in 16 high-income nations," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 47-52.
    4. Wilsford, David, 1994. "Path Dependency, or Why History Makes It Difficult but Not Impossible to Reform Health Care Systems in a Big Way," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 251-283, July.
    5. Smith, Peter C. & Anell, Anders & Busse, Reinhard & Crivelli, Luca & Healy, Judith & Lindahl, Anne Karin & Westert, Gert & Kene, Tobechukwu, 2012. "Leadership and governance in seven developed health systems," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 37-49.
    6. Eikemo, Terje Andreas & Bambra, Clare & Judge, Ken & Ringdal, Kristen, 2008. "Welfare state regimes and differences in self-perceived health in Europe: A multilevel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(11), pages 2281-2295, June.
    7. Eddy van Doorslaer & Cristina Masseria, 2004. "Income-Related Inequality in the Use of Medical Care in 21 OECD Countries," OECD Health Working Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cacace, Mirella & Ettelt, Stefanie & Mays, Nicholas & Nolte, Ellen, 2013. "Assessing quality in cross-country comparisons of health systems and policies: Towards a set of generic quality criteria," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 156-162.
    2. Westra, Daan & Angeli, Federica & Carree, Martin & Ruwaard, Dirk, 2017. "Understanding competition between healthcare providers: Introducing an intermediary inter-organizational perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 149-157.
    3. repec:jet:dpaper:dpaper391 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Davis, Peter & Milne, Barry & Parker, Karl & Hider, Phil & Lay-Yee, Roy & Cumming, Jackie & Graham, Patrick, 2013. "Efficiency, effectiveness, equity (E3). Evaluating hospital performance in three dimensions," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 19-27.
    5. Matthias Fischer, 2016. "Welfare with or without Growth? Potential Lessons from the German Healthcare System," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(11), pages 1-14, October.
    6. Mackenbach, Johan P. & McKee, Martin, 2015. "Government, politics and health policy: A quantitative analysis of 30 European countries," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(10), pages 1298-1308.
    7. Embrett, Mark G. & Randall, G.E., 2014. "Social determinants of health and health equity policy research: Exploring the use, misuse, and nonuse of policy analysis theory," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 147-155.

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