IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/hepoli/v113y2013i3p258-269.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Five types of OECD healthcare systems: Empirical results of a deductive classification

Author

Listed:
  • Böhm, Katharina
  • Schmid, Achim
  • Götze, Ralf
  • Landwehr, Claudia
  • Rothgang, Heinz

Abstract

This article classifies 30 OECD healthcare systems according to a deductively generated typology by Rothgang and Wendt [1]. This typology distinguishes three core dimensions of the healthcare system: regulation, financing, and service provision, and three types of actors: state, societal, and private actors. We argue that there is a hierarchical relationship between the three dimensions, led by regulation, followed by financing and finally service provision, where the superior dimension restricts the nature of the subordinate dimensions. This hierarchy rule limits the number of theoretically plausible types to ten. To test our argument, we classify 30 OECD healthcare systems, mainly using OECD Health Data and WHO country reports. The classification results in five system types: the National Health Service, the National Health Insurance, the Social Health Insurance, the Etatist Social Health Insurance, and the Private Health System. All five types belong to the group of healthcare system types considered theoretically plausible. Merely Slovenia does not comply with our assumption of a hierarchy among dimensions and typical actors due to its singular transformation history.

Suggested Citation

  • Böhm, Katharina & Schmid, Achim & Götze, Ralf & Landwehr, Claudia & Rothgang, Heinz, 2013. "Five types of OECD healthcare systems: Empirical results of a deductive classification," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(3), pages 258-269.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:258-269
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.09.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851013002285
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. AfDB AfDB, . "African Statistical Yearbook 2012," African Statistical Yearbook, African Development Bank, number 387.
    2. Rothgang, Heinz & Cacace, Mirella & Grimmeisen, Simone & Wendt, Claus, 2005. "9 The changing role of the state in healthcare systems," European Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(S1), pages 187-212, March.
    3. Adolf Stepan & Margit Sommersguter-Reichmann, 2005. "Monitoring political decision-making and its impact in Austria," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(S1), pages 7-23.
    4. Lee, Sang-Yi & Chun, Chang-Bae & Lee, Yong-Gab & Seo, Nam Kyu, 2008. "The National Health Insurance system as one type of new typology: The case of South Korea and Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 105-113, January.
    5. Elizabeth Docteur & Howard Oxley, 2003. "Health-Care Systems: Lessons from the Reform Experience," OECD Health Working Papers 9, OECD Publishing.
    6. Albreht, Tit & Klazinga, Niek, 2009. "Privatisation of health care in Slovenia in the period 1992-2008," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(2-3), pages 262-269, May.
    7. Culyer, A J, 1989. "The Normative Economics of Health Care Finance and Provision," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 34-58, Spring.
    8. Isabelle Joumard & Christophe André & Chantal Nicq, 2010. "Health Care Systems: Efficiency and Institutions," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 769, OECD Publishing.
    9. Wilsford, David, 1994. "Path Dependency, or Why History Makes It Difficult but Not Impossible to Reform Health Care Systems in a Big Way," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(03), pages 251-283, July.
    10. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1978:68:11:1125-1131_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:hepoli:v:121:y:2017:i:5:p:525-533 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Ammi, Mehdi & Fortier, Grant, 2017. "The influence of welfare systems on pay-for-performance programs for general practitioners: A critical review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 157-166.
    3. Plümper, Thomas & Neumayer, Eric, 2014. "Income Inequality, Redistribution and their Effect on Inequality in Longevity," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 210, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    4. Krachler, Nick & Greer, Ian, 2015. "When does marketisation lead to privatisation? Profit-making in English health services after the 2012 Health and Social Care Act," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 215-223.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Classification; Healthcare systems; OECD;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:258-269. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu) or (). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.