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Disability and Multi-Dimensional Quality of Life: A Capability Approach to Health Status Assessment

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  • Anand, Paul

    () (The Open University)

  • Roope, Laurence

    () (University of Oxford)

  • Culyer, Anthony J.

    () (University of York)

  • Smith, Ron P.

    () (Birkbeck College, University of London)

Abstract

This paper offers an approach to assessing quality-of-life, based on Sen's (1985) theory, which it uses to understand loss in quality-of-life due to mobility-impairment. Specifically, it provides a theoretical analysis which is able to account for the possibility that some functionings may increase when a person's capabilities decrease, if substitution effects are large enough. We then develop novel data consistent with our theoretical Senian framework that permits comparison of quality-of-life between those with a disability (mobility-impairment) and those without. Empirical results show that mobility impairment has widespread rather than concentrated impacts on capabilities and is associated with higher psychological costs.. We also find evidence that a small number of functionings are higher for those with a disability, as our theory allows. The paper concludes by discussing possible implications for policy and health assessment methods.

Suggested Citation

  • Anand, Paul & Roope, Laurence & Culyer, Anthony J. & Smith, Ron P., 2019. "Disability and Multi-Dimensional Quality of Life: A Capability Approach to Health Status Assessment," IZA Discussion Papers 12686, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12686
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 15th June 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-06-15 11:00:19

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    mobility impairment; disability; capabilities; health; Sen; extra-welfarism;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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