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Mark Pauly on Welfare Economics: Normative Rabbits from Positive Hats

Author

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  • Evans, R.G.
  • Culyer, A.J.

Abstract

Mark Pauly's (Pauly, 1994a) editorial comment on Labelle et al. (1994a) sows seeds whose harvest is a dangerous confusion of intellectual categories. Out of that confusion, he dismisses as irrelevant an approach to the evaluation of social arrangements in health care that we and many others consider a useful normative framework, and that is increasingly widely used.

Suggested Citation

  • Evans, R.G. & Culyer, A.J., 1995. "Mark Pauly on Welfare Economics: Normative Rabbits from Positive Hats," Centre for Health Services and Policy Research 95:5r, University of British Columbia - Centre for Health Services and Policy Research..
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:brichs:95:5r
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pauly, Mark V., 1994. "Reply to Roberta Labelle, Greg Stoddart and Thomas Rice," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 495-496.
    2. Culyer, A J, 1989. "The Normative Economics of Health Care Finance and Provision," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 34-58, Spring.
    3. Labelle, Roberta & Stoddart, Greg & Rice, Thomas, 1994. "Editorial: Response to Pauly on a re-examination of the meaning and importance of supplier-induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 491-494.
    4. Anthony J. Culyer (ed.), 1991. "The Economics Of Health," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 541.
    5. Pauly, Mark V., 1994. "Editorial: A re-examination of the meaning and importance of supplier-induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 369-372, October.
    6. Labelle, Roberta & Stoddart, Greg & Rice, Thomas, 1994. "A re-examination of the meaning and importance of supplier-induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 347-368, October.
    7. Sen, Amartya K, 1979. "Personal Utilities and Public Judgements: Or What's Wrong with Welfare Economics?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 89(355), pages 537-558, September.
    8. Sugden, Robert & Williams, Alan, 1978. "The Principles of Practical Cost-Benefit Analysis," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198770411.
    9. Culyer, A. J. & Wagstaff, Adam, 1993. "Equity and equality in health and health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 431-457, December.
    10. Charles Blackorby & David Donaldson, 1990. "A Review Article: The Case against the Use of the Sum of Compensating Variations in Cost-Benefit Analysis," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 23(3), pages 471-494, August.
    11. Harberger, Arnold C, 1971. "Three Basic Postulates for Applied Welfare Economics: An Interpretive Essay," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 785-797, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. W.B.F. Brouwer & F.T. Schut, 1999. "Priority care for employees: A blessing in disguise?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 65-73.
    2. Amiram Gafni, 2006. "Economic Evaluation of Health-care Programmes: Is CEA Better than CBA?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 34(3), pages 407-418, July.
    3. Ruth Mcdonald, 1999. "Health economics has lost its way-or why David Kernick is (partly) right," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(2), pages 175-176.
    4. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2008. "Policy Analysis in the Health-Services Market: Accounting for Quality and Quantity," Cahiers de recherche 0807, CIRPEE.
    5. Claxton, Karl, 1999. "The irrelevance of inference: a decision-making approach to the stochastic evaluation of health care technologies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 341-364, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HEALTH SERVICES;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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