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Multivariate dependence of implied volatilities from equity options as measure of systemic risk

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  • Jobst, Andreas A.

Abstract

This paper presents a methodology to examine the multivariate tail dependence of the implied volatility of equity options as an early warning indicator of systemic risk within the financial sector. Using non-parametric methods of estimating changes in the dependence structure in response to common shocks affecting individual risk profiles, possible linkages during periods of stress are quantifiable while recognizing that large shocks are transmitted across financial markets differently than small shocks. Before and during the initial phase of the financial crisis, we find that systemic risk increased globally as early as February 2007 — months before the unraveling of the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis and long before the collapse of Lehman Brothers. The average (multivariate) dependence among a global sample of banks and insurance companies increased by almost 30% while joint tail risk declined by about the same order of magnitude, indicating that co-movements of large changes in equity volatility were more likely to occur and responses to extreme shocks became more differentiated as distress escalated. The key policy consideration flowing from our analysis is that complementary measures of joint tail risk at high data frequency are essential to the robust measurement of systemic risk, which could enhance market-based early warning mechanisms as part of macroprudential surveillance.

Suggested Citation

  • Jobst, Andreas A., 2013. "Multivariate dependence of implied volatilities from equity options as measure of systemic risk," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 112-129.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finana:v:28:y:2013:i:c:p:112-129
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irfa.2013.01.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Simone Varotto & Lei Zhao, 2014. "Systemic Risk and Bank Size," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2014-17, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Andreas A. Jobst & Dale F. Gray, 2013. "Systemic Contingent Claims Analysis; Estimating Market-Implied Systemic Risk," IMF Working Papers 13/54, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Jobst, Andreas A., 2014. "Measuring systemic risk-adjusted liquidity (SRL)—A model approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 270-287.
    4. International Monetary Fund, 2016. "Slovak Republic; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 16/14, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Silva, Walmir & Kimura, Herbert & Sobreiro, Vinicius Amorim, 2017. "An analysis of the literature on systemic financial risk: A survey," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 91-114.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early warning; Dependence; Correlation; Co-movement; Systemic risk; Extreme value theory; Generalized extreme value; Entropy; Financial contagion; Macroprudential surveillance;

    JEL classification:

    • C46 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Specific Distributions
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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