IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/enepol/v61y2013icp1481-1489.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The winds of change: How wind firms assess Germany's energy transition

Author

Listed:
  • Smith Stegen, Karen
  • Seel, Matthias

Abstract

In September 2010 the German government initiated a plan to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energies, with nuclear power as a bridging fuel. Following the Fukushima nuclear disaster, however, the government decided to immediately shut down almost half of Germany's reactors and phase out the rest by 2022. The outcome of Germany's energy transition (Energiewende) from high-carbon and nuclear sources of power to renewable energies has implications for Germany's prosperity and may serve as either a positive or negative model for other countries. Achieving the Energiewende will require the commitment of Germany's renewable energy companies, whose opinions on the transition have not yet been reported. This article seeks to help fill this gap by relating the views of over 80 percent of Germany's wind industry, per market share. The firms in our study are mostly optimistic about the government's ambitious targets, but express concern over the prospects for offshore wind, lagging network expansion, and the efficacy of extant legislation to support the transition. From the government's side, cost concerns have already led to discussions of slowing the transition, leading to a push–pullback policy approach. For the transition to proceed smoothly, fundamental issues, such as market design, must be resolved.

Suggested Citation

  • Smith Stegen, Karen & Seel, Matthias, 2013. "The winds of change: How wind firms assess Germany's energy transition," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1481-1489.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:61:y:2013:i:c:p:1481-1489
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.06.130
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030142151300637X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Friedman, Lee S., 2011. "The importance of marginal cost electricity pricing to the success of greenhouse gas reduction programs," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7347-7360.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Goetzke, Frank & Rave, Tilmann, 2016. "Exploring heterogeneous growth of wind energy across Germany," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 193-205.
    2. Smith Stegen, Karen, 2015. "Heavy rare earths, permanent magnets, and renewable energies: An imminent crisis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 1-8.
    3. Janhunen, Sari & Hujala, Maija & Pätäri, Satu, 2014. "Owners of second homes, locals and their attitudes towards future rural wind farm," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 450-460.
    4. Geels, Frank W. & Kern, Florian & Fuchs, Gerhard & Hinderer, Nele & Kungl, Gregor & Mylan, Josephine & Neukirch, Mario & Wassermann, Sandra, 2016. "The enactment of socio-technical transition pathways: A reformulated typology and a comparative multi-level analysis of the German and UK low-carbon electricity transitions (1990–2014)," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 896-913.
    5. Phil Johnstone & Andy Stirling, 2015. "Comparing Nuclear Power Trajectories inGermany And the UK: From ‘Regimes’ to ‘Democracies’ in Sociotechnical Transitions and Discontinuities," SPRU Working Paper Series 2015-18, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School.
    6. Mirzabaev, Alisher & Guta, Dawit & Goedecke, Jann & Gaur, Varun & Börner, Jan & Virchow, Detlef & Denich, Manfred & von Braun, Joachim, 2014. "Bioenergy, Food Security and Poverty Reduction: Mitigating tradeoffs and promoting synergies along the Water- Energy-Food Security Nexus," Working Papers 180421, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    7. de Gooyert, Vincent & Rouwette, Etiënne & van Kranenburg, Hans & Freeman, Edward & van Breen, Harry, 2016. "Sustainability transition dynamics: Towards overcoming policy resistance," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 135-145.
    8. Juliana Subtil Lacerda & Jeroen C. J. M. van den Bergh, 2014. "International Diffusion of Renewable Energy Innovations: Lessons from the Lead Markets for Wind Power in China, Germany and USA," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(12), pages 1-28, December.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:61:y:2013:i:c:p:1481-1489. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.