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Stated versus revealed knowledge: Determinants of offsetting CO2 emissions from fuel consumption in vehicle use

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  • Ziegler, Andreas
  • Schwarzkopf, Julia
  • Hoffmann, Volker H.

Abstract

This paper examines the role of prior knowledge in offsetting CO2 emissions from fuel consumption in vehicle use. The main result of our econometric analysis on the basis of unique representative data from drivers’ license holders in the USA and Germany refers to the strong discrepancy between the stated and revealed knowledge of CO2 offsetting. The revealed knowledge – measured by the correct estimation of the costs for this offsetting practice – has a positive impact on the stated purchase of corresponding offsetting credits in both countries. In contrast, the effect of the stated knowledge of offsetting is not robust and in some cases even negative. Surprisingly, it cannot even be confirmed that drivers’ license holders who claim that they are more than sufficiently informed estimate these costs more accurately.

Suggested Citation

  • Ziegler, Andreas & Schwarzkopf, Julia & Hoffmann, Volker H., 2012. "Stated versus revealed knowledge: Determinants of offsetting CO2 emissions from fuel consumption in vehicle use," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 422-431.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:40:y:2012:i:c:p:422-431
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.10.027
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    Cited by:

    1. Ziegler, Andreas & Schwirplies, Claudia, 2014. "The determinants of voluntary carbon offsetting: A micro-econometric analysis of individuals from Germany and the United States," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100422, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Schwirplies, Claudia & Dütschke, Elisabeth & Schleich, Joachim & Ziegler, Andreas, 2017. "Consumers' willingness to offset their CO2 emissions from traveling: A discrete choice analysis of framing and provider contributions," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S05/2017, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    3. Blasch, Julia & Farsi, Mehdi, 2012. "Retail demand for voluntary carbon offsets – a choice experiment among Swiss consumers," MPRA Paper 41259, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Spickermann, Alexander & Grienitz, Volker & von der Gracht, Heiko A., 2014. "Heading towards a multimodal city of the future?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 201-221.
    5. repec:eee:touman:v:45:y:2014:i:c:p:194-198 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Balderas Torres, Arturo & MacMillan, Douglas C. & Skutsch, Margaret & Lovett, Jon C., 2015. "Reprint of ‘Yes-in-my-backyard’: Spatial differences in the valuation of forest services and local co-benefits for carbon markets in México," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 283-294.
    7. repec:eee:ememar:v:38:y:2019:i:c:p:197-218 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Balderas Torres, Arturo & MacMillan, Douglas C. & Skutsch, Margaret & Lovett, Jon C., 2015. "‘Yes-in-my-backyard’: Spatial differences in the valuation of forest services and local co-benefits for carbon markets in México," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 130-141.

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    Keywords

    Climate change; CO2 offsetting; Vehicle use;

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