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Demand elasticity of oil in Barbados

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  • Moore, Alvon

Abstract

The importation of oil is a significant component of Barbados' imports, rising from 7% of imports in 1998 to over 20% in 2009. This increase has impacted greatly on the level of foreign reserves. As a price-taker, relying entirely on imported oil for our energy needs could prove a continuous drain on the economy. With a view to formulating an appropriate energy policy for Barbados, this paper analyses the demand for oil using monthly data from 1998 to 2009. The paper estimates the elasticities of demand for oil by employing PesAran (2001) single equation cointegration approach and comparing the results with countries that rely heavily on imported oil and whose policy objective are to alter their energy structure to rely less on imported oil. The results show that the demand for oil imports is price inelastic in the long run. The consumption of oil is responsive to past consumption, prices, income, electricity consumption and the number of appliances imported in the short-run. A policy framework to reduce the use of oil for electricity consumption via alternative energy sources should be considered and the taxation of oil imports given its elasticity is a good source of revenue.

Suggested Citation

  • Moore, Alvon, 2011. "Demand elasticity of oil in Barbados," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3515-3519, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:6:p:3515-3519
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    Cited by:

    1. Winston Moore & Mika Korkeakoski & Jyrki Luukkanen & Laron Alleyne & Abdullahi Abdulkadri & Noel Brown & Therese Chambers & Orlando Costa & Alecia Evans & Sidonia McKenzie & Dwight Reid & Luis Vazquez, 2016. "Modelling Long-Run Energy Development Plans: The Case of Barbados," EcoMod2016 9403, EcoMod.
    2. Jackman, Mahalia, 2012. "What Prompts Central Bank Intervention in the Barbadian Foreign Exchange Market?," MPRA Paper 41703, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Mohammad Jaforullah & Alan King, 2015. "is New Zealand's economy vulnerable to world oil market shocks?," Working Papers 1503, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2015.
    4. Adewuyi, Adeolu O., 2016. "Determinants of import demand for non-renewable energy (petroleum) products: Empirical evidence from Nigeria," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 73-93.
    5. Marbuah, George, 2014. "Understanding crude oil import demand behaviour in Ghana," MPRA Paper 60436, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Salisu, Afees A. & Ayinde, Taofeek O., 2016. "Modeling energy demand: Some emerging issues," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1470-1480.

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    Keywords

    Oil Demand Elasticity;

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