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US long-term energy intensity: Backcast and projection


  • Dowlatabadi, Hadi
  • Oravetz, Matthew A.


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  • Dowlatabadi, Hadi & Oravetz, Matthew A., 2006. "US long-term energy intensity: Backcast and projection," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 3245-3256, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:34:y:2006:i:17:p:3245-3256

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Loschel, Andreas, 2002. "Technological change in economic models of environmental policy: a survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2-3), pages 105-126, December.
    9. Peck, Stephen C & Teisberg, Thomas J, 1995. "International CO2 emissions control : An analysis using CETA," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 297-308.
    10. David Popp, 2002. "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 160-180, March.
    11. Mark K. Jaccard & John Nyboer & Crhis Bataille & Bryn Sadownik, 2003. "Modeling the Cost of Climate Policy: Distinguishing Between Alternative Cost Definitions and Long-Run Cost Dynamics," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 49-73.
    12. Grubler, Arnulf & Nakicenovic, Nebojsa & Victor, David G., 1999. "Dynamics of energy technologies and global change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 247-280, May.
    13. Manne, Alan & Richels, Richard, 2004. "The impact of learning-by-doing on the timing and costs of CO2 abatement," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 603-619, July.
    14. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1999. "The Kyoto Protocol: A Cost-Effective Strategy for Meeting Environmental Objectives?," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-23.
    15. William W. Hogan & Dale W. Jorgenson, 1991. "Productivity Trends and the Cost of Reducing CO2 Emissions," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 67-86.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shahiduzzaman, Md & Layton, Allan, 2017. "Decomposition analysis for assessing the United States 2025 emissions target: How big is the challenge?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 372-383.
    2. Kialashaki, Arash & Reisel, John R., 2014. "Development and validation of artificial neural network models of the energy demand in the industrial sector of the United States," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 749-760.
    3. Ahlroth, Sofia & Hojer, Mattias, 2007. "Sustainable energy prices and growth: Comparing macroeconomic and backcasting scenarios," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 722-731, September.
    4. Okushima, Shinichiro & Tamura, Makoto, 2011. "Identifying the sources of energy use change: Multiple calibration decomposition analysis and structural decomposition analysis," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 313-326.
    5. Klaus Keller & Louise I. Miltich & Alexander Robinson & Richard S.J. Tol, 2007. "How overconfident are current projections of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions?," Working Papers FNU-124, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jan 2007.
    6. Li, Yi & Sun, Linyan & Feng, Taiwen & Zhu, Chunyan, 2013. "How to reduce energy intensity in China: A regional comparison perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 513-522.
    7. Jean-Francois Mercure, 2012. "On the changeover timescales of technology transitions and induced efficiency changes: an overarching theory," Papers 1209.0424,
    8. Sue Wing, Ian, 2008. "Explaining the declining energy intensity of the U.S. economy," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 21-49, January.
    9. Sue Wing, Ian & Eckaus, Richard S., 2007. "The implications of the historical decline in US energy intensity for long-run CO2 emission projections," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5267-5286, November.
    10. Bibas, Ruben & Méjean, Aurélie & Hamdi-Cherif, Meriem, 2015. "Energy efficiency policies and the timing of action: An assessment of climate mitigation costs," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PA), pages 137-152.
    11. Kemp-Benedict, Eric, 2014. "The inverted pyramid: A neo-Ricardian view on the economy–environment relationship," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 230-241.

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