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Impacts of climate policy on the competitiveness of Canadian industry: How big and how to mitigate?

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  • Rivers, Nic

Abstract

Competitiveness concerns have been at the forefront of climate policy debates in Canada particularly as a result of its high energy intensity and significant exposure to international markets. This paper uses a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to assess the likely impacts on sectoral competitiveness that would accompany efforts to meet greenhouse gas mitigation targets that have been set by the Canadian government. Additionally, it evaluates several design mechanisms that could be used to reduce the negative competiveness impacts associated with adoption of domestic climate policies. The analysis suggests that several sectors would likely face significant competiveness challenges under a reference scenario in which permits are given to emitters in lump sum. However, it finds that competiveness impacts can be minimized by using output-based recycling of permits, or by using border tax adjustments.

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  • Rivers, Nic, 2010. "Impacts of climate policy on the competitiveness of Canadian industry: How big and how to mitigate?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1092-1104, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:5:p:1092-1104
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Zhong Xiang, 2012. "Competitiveness and Leakage Concerns and Border Carbon Adjustments," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 6(3), pages 225-287, December.
    2. Li, Aijun & Du, Nan & Wei, Qian, 2014. "The cross-country implications of alternative climate policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 155-163.
    3. Alfredo Marvão Pereira & Rui M. Pereira, 2015. "Reducing Carbon Emissions in Portugal: The Relative Roles of Fossil-Fuel Prices, Energy Efficiency, and Carbon Taxation," Working Papers 154, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
    4. Lin, Boqiang & Li, Aijun, 2012. "Impacts of removing fossil fuel subsidies on China: How large and how to mitigate?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 741-749.
    5. Ling Tang & Qin Bao & ZhongXiang Zhang & Shouyang Wang, 2015. "Carbon-based border tax adjustments and China’s international trade: analysis based on a dynamic computable general equilibrium model," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 329-360, April.
    6. Stephanie MacLeod & Yves Filion, 2012. "Issues and Implications of Carbon-Abatement Discounting and Pricing for Drinking Water System Design in Canada," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(1), pages 43-61, January.
    7. Orlov, Anton & Grethe, Harald, 2012. "Carbon taxation and market structure: A CGE analysis for Russia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 696-707.
    8. Christoph Böhringer & Brita Bye & Taran Fæhn & Knut Einar Rosendahl, 2014. "Output-based rebating of carbon taxes in the neighbor's backyard. Competitiveness, leakage and welfare," Discussion Papers 783, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    9. Jared C. Carbone & Nicholas Rivers, 2014. "Climate policy and competitiveness: Policy guidance and quantitative evidence," Working Papers 2014-05, Colorado School of Mines, Division of Economics and Business.
    10. Bao, Qin & Tang, Ling & Zhang, ZhongXiang & Wang, Shouyang, 2013. "Impacts of border carbon adjustments on China's sectoral emissions: Simulations with a dynamic computable general equilibrium model," China Economic Review, Elsevier, pages 77-94.
    11. Ghosh, Madanmohan & Luo, Deming & Siddiqui, Muhammad Shahid & Zhu, Yunfa, 2012. "Border tax adjustments in the climate policy context: CO2 versus broad-based GHG emission targeting," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 154-167.
    12. Christoph Böhringer & Brita Bye & Taran Fæhn & Rosendahl Knut Einar, 2014. "Output-based rebating of carbon taxes in the neighbor’s backyard," Working Papers V-382-15, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2014.
    13. Moreno, Blanca & García-Álvarez, María Teresa & Ramos, Carmen & Fernández-Vázquez, Esteban, 2014. "A General Maximum Entropy Econometric approach to model industrial electricity prices in Spain: A challenge for the competitiveness," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 815-824.
    14. Bao, Qin & Tang, Ling & Zhang, ZhingXiang & Qiao, Han & Wang, Shouyang, 2012. "Impact of Border Carbon Adjustments on China’s Sectoral Emissions: Simulations with a Dynamic Computable General Equilibirum Model," Working Papers 249391, Australian National University, Centre for Climate Economics & Policy.
    15. Lin, Boqiang & Li, Aijun, 2011. "Impacts of carbon motivated border tax adjustments on competitiveness across regions in China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 5111-5118.
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    18. repec:eee:enepol:v:111:y:2017:i:c:p:32-40 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:118-130 is not listed on IDEAS

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