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Econometric modelling of international carbon tax regimes

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  • Smith, Clare
  • Hall, Stephen
  • Mabey, Nick

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  • Smith, Clare & Hall, Stephen & Mabey, Nick, 1995. "Econometric modelling of international carbon tax regimes," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 133-146, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:17:y:1995:i:2:p:133-146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    2. John P. Weyant, 1993. "Costs of Reducing Global Carbon Emissions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 27-46, Fall.
    3. Alan Manne & Richard Richels, 1992. "Buying Greenhouse Insurance: The Economic Costs of CO2 Emission Limits," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026213280x, January.
    4. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
    5. Peter Hoeller & Jonathan Coppel, 1992. "Energy Taxation and Price Distortions in Fossil Fuel Markets: Some Implications for Climate Change Policy," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 110, OECD Publishing.
    6. H Neuburger, 1992. "Energy use in an era of rapidly changing oil price -- how OPEC did not save the world from the greenhouse effect," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 24(7), pages 1039-1050, July.
    7. William W. Hogan & Dale W. Jorgenson, 1991. "Productivity Trends and the Cost of Reducing CO2 Emissions," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 67-86.
    8. Barr, D G & Cuthbertson, Keith, 1991. "Neoclassical Consumer Demand Theory and the Demand for Money," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 855-876, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gupta, Sujata & Hall, Stephen, 1997. "Stabilizing energy related CO2 emissions for India," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 125-150, March.
    2. Hunt, Lester C. & Ninomiya, Yasushi, 2005. "Primary energy demand in Japan: an empirical analysis of long-term trends and future CO2 emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1409-1424, July.
    3. Lin, Boqiang & Wang, Ailun, 2015. "Estimating energy conservation potential in China's commercial sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 147-156.
    4. Suganthi, L. & Samuel, Anand A., 2012. "Energy models for demand forecasting—A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 1223-1240.
    5. Riker, David A., 2012. "International coal trade and restrictions on coal consumption," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1244-1249.
    6. Lester C. Hunt & Guy Judge & Yashushi Ninomiya, 2000. "Modelling Technical Progress: An Application of the Stochastic Trend Model to UK Energy Demand," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 99, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    7. Liang, Qiao-Mei & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2012. "Distributional impacts of taxing carbon in China: Results from the CEEPA model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 545-551.
    8. Hunt, Lester C. & Judge, Guy & Ninomiya, Yasushi, 2003. "Underlying trends and seasonality in UK energy demand: a sectoral analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 93-118, January.
    9. Mabey, Nick & Nixon, James, 1997. "Are environmental taxes a free lunch? Issues in modelling the macroeconomic effects of carbon taxes," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 29-56, March.
    10. Lin, Boqiang & Ouyang, Xiaoling, 2014. "Electricity demand and conservation potential in the Chinese nonmetallic mineral products industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 243-253.
    11. Kunsch, P. & Springael, J., 2008. "Simulation with system dynamics and fuzzy reasoning of a tax policy to reduce CO2 emissions in the residential sector," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 185(3), pages 1285-1299, March.
    12. Holtsmark, Bjart & Maestad, Ottar, 2002. "Emission trading under the Kyoto Protocol--effects on fossil fuel markets under alternative regimes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 207-218, February.
    13. Qian Wang & Qiao-Mei Liang, 2015. "Will a carbon tax hinder China’s efforts to improve its primary income distribution status?," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 20(8), pages 1407-1436, December.

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