IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/jecper/v7y1993i4p27-46.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Costs of Reducing Global Carbon Emissions

Author

Listed:
  • John P. Weyant

Abstract

Projecting the costs of reducing carbon emissions is extremely important, and exceedingly difficult. Such projections are an integral component of cost-benefit analyses of alternative policies in response to climate change. This paper first discusses the key dimensions of any projection of the cost of reducing carbon emissions. Then it discusses the projections that have been made, including long-, medium- and short-range time horizons. Finally, the conclusion summarizes what we know and don't know about the costs of controlling carbon emissions and recommends an agenda for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • John P. Weyant, 1993. "Costs of Reducing Global Carbon Emissions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 27-46, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:7:y:1993:i:4:p:27-46
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.7.4.27
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.7.4.27
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Charles Blitzer & Richard Eckaus & Supriya Lahiri & Alexander Meeraus, 1993. "Growth and Welfare Losses from Carbon Emissions Restrictions: A General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 57-82.
    2. William D. Nordhaus, 1973. "The Allocation of Energy Resources," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 4(3), pages 529-576.
    3. Nordhaus, William D, 1993. "Optimal Greenhouse-Gas Reductions and Tax Policy in the "Dice" Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 313-317, May.
    4. Clarke, Rosemary & Boero, Gianna & Winters, L Alan, 1996. "Controlling Greenhouse Gases: A Survey of Global Macroeconomic Studies," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 269-308, October.
    5. Stephen C Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1992. "CETA: A Model for Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 55-78.
    6. Alan Manne & Richard Richels, 1992. "Buying Greenhouse Insurance: The Economic Costs of CO2 Emission Limits," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026213280x, December.
    7. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1990. "CO2 Emission Limits: An Economic Cost Analysis for the USA," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 51-74.
    8. Giuseppe Nicoletti & Joaquim Oliveira Martins, 1992. "Global Effects of the European Carbon Tax," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 125, OECD Publishing.
    9. William R. Cline, 1992. "Economics of Global Warming, The," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 39, July.
    10. Clarke, Rosemary & Boero, Gianna & Winters, L Alan, 1996. "Controlling Greenhouse Gases: A Survey of Global Macroeconomic Studies," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(4), pages 269-308, October.
    11. Richard Schmalensee, 1993. "Comparing Greenhouse Gases for Policy Purposes," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 245-256.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Fankhauser, Samuel & Kverndokk, Snorre, 1996. "The global warming game -- Simulations of a CO2-reduction agreement," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 83-102, March.
    2. Peck, Stephen C & Teisberg, Thomas J, 1995. "International CO2 emissions control : An analysis using CETA," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 297-308.
    3. William D. Nordhaus, 1993. "Reflections on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 11-25, Fall.
    4. Michaelis, P., 1999. "Sustainable greenhouse policies: the role of non-CO2 gases," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 239-260, June.
    5. Kolstad, Charles D. & Toman, Michael, 2005. "The Economics of Climate Policy," Handbook of Environmental Economics, in: K. G. Mäler & J. R. Vincent (ed.), Handbook of Environmental Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1561-1618, Elsevier.
    6. Plambeck, Erica L. & Hope, Chris & Anderson, John, 1997. "The model: Integrating the science and economics of global warming," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 77-101, March.
    7. Wei, Yi-Ming & Mi, Zhi-Fu & Huang, Zhimin, 2015. "Climate policy modeling: An online SCI-E and SSCI based literature review," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 57(PA), pages 70-84.
    8. Paul Ekins, 1995. "Rethinking the costs related to global warming: A survey of the issues," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 6(3), pages 231-277, October.
    9. Zili Yang, 2001. "Time Preference, Stock Externalities and Strategic Reactions," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 18(2), pages 233-250, February.
    10. Gjerde, Jon & Grepperud, Sverre & Kverndokk, Snorre, 1999. "Optimal climate policy under the possibility of a catastrophe," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 289-317, August.
    11. Bovenberg, A Lans & Goulder, Lawrence H, 1996. "Optimal Environmental Taxation in the Presence of Other Taxes: General-Equilibrium Analyses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 985-1000, September.
    12. Williams, Michael, 1995. "Global warming and carbon taxation: Optimal policy and the role of administration costs," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 319-327, October.
    13. Marten, Alex L. & Newbold, Stephen C., 2012. "Estimating the social cost of non-CO2 GHG emissions: Methane and nitrous oxide," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 957-972.
    14. Ekins, Paul, 1996. "How large a carbon tax is justified by the secondary benefits of CO2 abatement?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-187, June.
    15. Nordhaus, William D, 1995. "The ghosts of climates past and the specters of climate change future," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 269-282.
    16. Berger, Loïc & Emmerling, Johannes, 2017. "Welfare as Simple(x) Equity Equivalents," MITP: Mitigation, Innovation and Transformation Pathways 254044, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    17. Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 1999. "Permit Trading Under the Kyoto Protocol and Beyond," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9902, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
    18. Toth, Ferenc L, 1995. "Discounting in integrated assessments of climate change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 403-409.
    19. William D. Nordhaus, 1992. "Lethal Model 2: The Limits to Growth Revisited," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(2), pages 1-60.
    20. Reyer Gerlagh & Bob van der Zwaan & Marjan Hofkes & Ger Klaassen, 2004. "Impacts of CO 2 -Taxes in an Economy with Niche Markets and Learning-by-Doing," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(3), pages 367-394, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:7:y:1993:i:4:p:27-46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Michael P. Albert (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.