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Sustainable greenhouse policies: the role of non-CO2 gases


  • Michaelis, P.


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  • Michaelis, P., 1999. "Sustainable greenhouse policies: the role of non-CO2 gases," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 239-260, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:10:y:1999:i:2:p:239-260

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bovenberg, A. L. & van der Ploeg, F., 1994. "Environmental policy, public finance and the labour market in a second-best world," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 349-390, November.
    2. Morgenstern, Richard D, 1991. "Towards a Comprehensive Approach to Global Climate Change Mitigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 140-145, May.
    3. William R. Cline, 1992. "Economics of Global Warming, The," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 39.
    4. Nordhaus, William D, 1993. "Optimal Greenhouse-Gas Reductions and Tax Policy in the "Dice" Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 313-317, May.
    5. Hoel, M. & Isaksen, I., 1993. "Efficient Abatement of Different Greenhouse Cases," Memorandum 05/1993, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    6. Peter Michaelis, 1992. "Global warming: Efficient policies in the case of multiple pollutants," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(1), pages 61-77, January.
    7. Stephen C Peck & Thomas J. Teisberg, 1992. "CETA: A Model for Carbon Emissions Trajectory Assessment," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 55-78.
    8. Nordhaus, William D., 1993. "Rolling the 'DICE': an optimal transition path for controlling greenhouse gases," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 27-50, March.
    9. William D. Nordhaus, 1991. "The Cost of Slowing Climate Change: a Survey," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 37-66.
    10. Richard Schmalensee, 1993. "Comparing Greenhouse Gases for Policy Purposes," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 245-256.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ziesemer, Thomas, 1995. "Reconciling environmental policy with employment, international competitiveness and participation requirements," Research Memorandum 016, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Moslener, Ulf & Requate, Till, 2009. "The dynamics of optimal abatement strategies for multiple pollutants--An illustration in the Greenhouse," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1521-1534, March.
    3. Baumgärtner, Stefan & Jöst, Frank & Winkler, Ralph, 2009. "Optimal dynamic scale and structure of a multi-pollution economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(4), pages 1226-1238, February.
    4. Gallo, Mariano, 2011. "A fuel surcharge policy for reducing road traffic greenhouse gas emissions," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 413-424, March.
    5. Moslener, Ulf & Requate, Till, 2007. "Optimal abatement in dynamic multi-pollutant problems when pollutants can be complements or substitutes," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 2293-2316, July.
    6. Stéphane De Cara & Elodie Debove & Pierre-Alain Jayet, 2006. "The Global Warming Potential Paradox: Implications for the Design of Climate Policy," Working Papers 2006/03, INRA, Economie Publique.

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