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Growth and Welfare Losses from Carbon Emissions Restrictions: A General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt


  • Charles Blitzer
  • Richard Eckaus
  • Supriya Lahiri
  • Alexander Meeraus


This paper assesses the economic effects of carbon emission restrictions in Egypt. Like other studies, it is an exemplification of some of the economic possibilities under various conditions. However, it extends the domain of possibilities and suggests some issues that have not been considered in other studies. It is demonstrated clearly that, while annual emissions constraints have only a modest effect on long-run economic growth rates, they have substantial effect on the achieved levels of GDP and welfare. These results do not change much, even with backstop and unconventional technologies or change in discounting. However, postponing the imposition of constraints does have a significant effect, as does changing the form of the constraints to one based on accumulated emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles Blitzer & Richard Eckaus & Supriya Lahiri & Alexander Meeraus, 1993. "Growth and Welfare Losses from Carbon Emissions Restrictions: A General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 57-82.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1993v14-01-a03

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. " Does the Stock Market Rationally Reflect Fundamental Values?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(3), pages 591-601, July.
    2. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    3. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    4. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
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    Cited by:

    1. Elbasha, Elamin H. & Roe, Terry L., 1995. "Environment in Three Classes of Endogenous Growth Models," Bulletins 7474, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
    2. Xie, Jian & Saltzman, Sidney, 2000. "Environmental Policy Analysis: An Environmental Computable General-Equilibrium Approach for Developing Countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 453-489, July.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General


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