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GREEN - - A Multi-Region Dynamic General Equilibrium Model for Quantifying the Costs of Curbing CO2 Emissions: A Technical Manual

Author

Listed:
  • Jean-Marc Burniaux

    (OECD)

  • John P. Martin

    (OECD)

  • Giuseppe Nicoletti

    (OECD)

  • Joaquim Oliveira Martins

    (OECD)

Abstract

The OECD Secretariat has developed a multi-region, multi-sector, dynamic applied general equilibrium (AGE) model to quantify the economy-wide and global costs of policies to curb emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). The project is called the GeneRal Equilibrium ENvironments model, hereafter referred to as GREEN. The purpose of this paper is to provide a full technical description of the GREEN model, its data base and parametrisation as of May 1991. Work is continuing to extend GREEN in several different directions to make the model more policy relevant, and a revised version of the technical manual will be issued in due course ... Cette étude porte sur la "ventilation" des variations de la croissance du revenu nominal entre la croissance réelle et l'inflation. Elle présente une analyse descriptive des données de la période d'après-guerre ainsi qu'une analyse par régression qui postule l'existence d'une ventilation dynamique stable. Cette analyse a été effectuée pour tous les pays Membres de l'OCDE. On admet en général que les pouvoirs publics ont la possibilité de maîtriser l'évolution du revenu nominal encore que l'étude présente également quelques données relatives aux rapports entre l'inflation et la croissance du revenu nominal et de la masse monétaire. On examine aussi le rôle des anticipations et de l'incertitude et leurs rapports avec l'action des pouvoirs publics ...

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Marc Burniaux & John P. Martin & Giuseppe Nicoletti & Joaquim Oliveira Martins, 1991. "GREEN - - A Multi-Region Dynamic General Equilibrium Model for Quantifying the Costs of Curbing CO2 Emissions: A Technical Manual," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 104, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:104-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/877165867056
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    1. Berg, Elin & Boug, Pal & Kverndokk, Snorre, 2001. "Norwegian gas sales and the impacts on European CO2 emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 427-456, July.
    2. García Fernández, Cristina, 2006. "Cost-benefit Analysis and the Difficulty of Applying it to Climate Change/El análisis coste-beneficio y la dificultad de su aplicación al cambio climático," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 24, pages 639(12á)-63, Agosto.
    3. Jan Bråten & Rolf Golombek, 1998. "OPEC's Response to International Climate Agreements," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(4), pages 425-442, December.
    4. Conrad, Klaus & Schmidt, Tobias F. N., 1997. "Double dividend of climate protection and the role of international policy coordination in the EU: an applied general equilibrium analysis with the GEM-E3 model," ZEW Discussion Papers 97-26, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. W. J. McKibbin & T. J. Bok, "undated". "The Impact on the Asia-Pacific Region of Fiscal Policy of the United States and Japan," Discussion Papers 120, Brookings Institution International Economics.
    6. Kydes, Andy S. & Shaw, Susan H. & McDonald, Douglas F., 1995. "Beyond the horizon: Recent directions in long-term energy modeling," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 131-149.
    7. Hochman, Gal & Kaplan, Scott & Zilberman, David, 2013. "The Causes of Recent Food Commodity Crises," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150423, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Lawrence H. Goulder, 1992. "Do the Costs of a Carbon Tax Vanish When Interactions With Other Taxes are Accounted For?," NBER Working Papers 4061, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Randhir, Timothy O. & Hertel, Thomas W., 2000. "Trade Liberalization as a Vehicle for Adapting to Global Warming," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 159-172, October.
    10. Su, Xuanming & Zhou, Weisheng & Sun, Faming & Nakagami, Ken'Ichi, 2014. "Possible pathways for dealing with Japan's post-Fukushima challenge and achieving CO2 emission reduction targets in 2030," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 90-97.
    11. K. Farmer & K.W. Steininger, 1999. "Reducing CO2-Emissions Under Fiscal Retrenchment: A Multi-Cohort CGE-Model for Austria," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(3), pages 309-340, April.
    12. Jaeger, William K., 1995. "The welfare cost of a global carbon tax when tax revenues are recycled," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 47-67, May.
    13. Fankhauser, Samuel & Kverndokk, Snorre, 1996. "The global warming game -- Simulations of a CO2-reduction agreement," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 83-102, March.
    14. Goulder, Lawrence H. & Schneider, Stephen H., 1999. "Induced technological change and the attractiveness of CO2 abatement policies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3-4), pages 211-253, August.

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