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Implicit collusion and individual market power in electricity markets

  • Anderson, E.J.
  • Cau, T.D.H.
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    Wholesale electricity markets may not produce competitive outcomes, either as a result of the exercise of market power, or through problems of implicit collusion. In comparison with the great amount of attention paid to issues of market power, the problems of implicit collusion have not been extensively studied. In this paper, we use a coevolutionary approach to explore the effect of the price elasticity of demand, capacity and forward contracts on implicit collusion in a duopoly. We will demonstrate that implicit collusion has the most importance in market conditions under which there is an intermediate amount of market power. Thus markets which are either highly competitive or in which one or both of the two generators can exercise considerable market power, are also markets in which implicitly collusive outcomes are less likely to arise.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Operational Research.

    Volume (Year): 211 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 403-414

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ejores:v:211:y:2011:i:2:p:403-414
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    7. Von der Fehr, N.H.M. & Harbord, D., 1992. "Spot Market Competition in the UK Electricity Industry," Memorandum 09/1992, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    8. Natalia Fabra & Juan Toro, 2001. "Price Wars and Collusion in the Spanish Electricity Market," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2001/05, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    9. Osborne, Martin J & Pitchik, Carolyn, 1987. "Cartels, Profits and Excess Capacity," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 28(2), pages 413-28, June.
    10. Brock, William A & Scheinkman, Jose A, 1985. "Price Setting Supergames with Capacity Constraints," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 371-82, July.
    11. Frank Wolak, 2000. "An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Hedge Contracts on Bidding Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 1-39.
    12. Rafael Macatangay, 2002. "Tacit Collusion in the Frequently Repeated Multi-Unit Uniform Price Auction for Wholesale Electricity in England and Wales," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 257-273, May.
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