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Why shops close again: An evolutionary perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours


  • Kosfeld, Michael


This paper introduces a new perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours based on ideas from evolutionary game theory. We study a retail economy where shopping hours have been deregulated recently. It is argued that first, the deregulation leads to a coordination problem between store owners and customer, and second, the `solution' to this problem depends on the specific cost structure of stores and the preferences of customers. In particular, it may happen that, even if it is profitable for both to keep stores open at night, they do not succeed in coordinating on this equilibrium. The analysis explains the observation in Germany, where shopping hours have been deregulated recently, that store owners tend to go back to the former shopping hours again. Moreover, it emphasizes the important role of advertisement campaigns as a signalling device.
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  • Kosfeld, Michael, 2002. "Why shops close again: An evolutionary perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 51-72, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:46:y:2002:i:1:p:51-72

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Inderst, Roman & Irmen, Andreas, 2005. "Shopping hours and price competition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 1105-1124, July.
    2. Raskovich, Alexander, 2007. "Ordered bargaining," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 1126-1143, October.
    3. Xiao, Tiaojun & Yu, Gang, 2006. "Supply chain disruption management and evolutionarily stable strategies of retailers in the quantity-setting duopoly situation with homogeneous goods," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 173(2), pages 648-668, September.
    4. Samuel de Haas & Daniel Herold & Jan T. Schaefer, 2017. "Shopping hours and entry - An empirical analysis of Aldi's opening hours," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201751, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    5. Tobias Wenzel, 2010. "Liberalization of Opening Hours with Free Entry," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 511-526, November.
    6. Javier de la Ballina Ballina & Rodolfo Vázquez, 2015. "El papel de las bluelaws en los modelos de evolución de los for¬matos comerciales," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 213(2), pages 63-82, June.
    7. Alexander Raskovich, 2006. "Ordered Bargaining," EAG Discussions Papers 200610, Department of Justice, Antitrust Division.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium


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