IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/econom/v193y2016i2p367-389.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

On the use of high frequency measures of volatility in MIDAS regressions

Author

Listed:
  • Andreou, Elena

Abstract

Many empirical studies link mixed data frequency variables such as low frequency macroeconomic or financial variables with high frequency financial indicators’ volatilities, especially within a predictive regression model context. The objective of this paper is threefold: First, we relate the standard Least Squares (LS) regression model with high frequency volatility predictors, with the corresponding Mixed Data Sampling Nonlinear LS (MIDAS-NLS) regression model (Ghysels et al., 2005, 2006), and evaluate the properties of the regression estimators of these models. We also consider alternative high frequency volatility measures as well as various continuous time models using their corresponding relevant higher-order moments to further analyze the properties of these estimators. Second, we derive the relative MSE efficiency of the slope estimator in the standard LS and MIDAS regressions, we provide conditions for relative efficiency and present the numerical results for different continuous time models. Third, we extend the analysis of the bias of the slope estimator in standard LS regressions with alternative realized measures of risk such as the Realized Covariance, Realized beta and the Realized Skewness when the true DGP is a MIDAS model.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreou, Elena, 2016. "On the use of high frequency measures of volatility in MIDAS regressions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 193(2), pages 367-389.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:193:y:2016:i:2:p:367-389
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeconom.2016.04.012
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304407616300719
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andersen T. G & Bollerslev T. & Diebold F. X & Labys P., 2001. "The Distribution of Realized Exchange Rate Volatility," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 42-55, March.
    2. Drost, Feike C & Nijman, Theo E, 1993. "Temporal Aggregation of GARCH Processes," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(4), pages 909-927, July.
    3. John Y. Campbell & Martin Lettau & Burton G. Malkiel & Yexiao Xu, 2001. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 1-43, February.
    4. Neil Shephard, 2004. "Regular and Modified Kernel-Based Estimators of Integrated Variance: The Case with Independent Noise," Economics Series Working Papers 2004-FE-20, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Schwert, G. William, 1989. "Business cycles, financial crises, and stock volatility," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 83-125, January.
    6. MEDDAHI, Nour, 2001. "An Eigenfunction Approach for Volatility Modeling," Cahiers de recherche 2001-29, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    7. Levine, Ross & Zervos, Sara, 1998. "Stock Markets, Banks, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 537-558, June.
    8. Dennis Kristensen, 2009. "On stationarity and ergodicity of the bilinear model with applications to GARCH models," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(1), pages 125-144, January.
    9. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2004. "Econometric Analysis of Realized Covariation: High Frequency Based Covariance, Regression, and Correlation in Financial Economics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(3), pages 885-925, May.
    10. Ghysels, Eric & Santa-Clara, Pedro & Valkanov, Rossen, 2005. "There is a risk-return trade-off after all," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 509-548, June.
    11. Zhang, Lan & Mykland, Per A. & Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 2005. "A Tale of Two Time Scales: Determining Integrated Volatility With Noisy High-Frequency Data," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 1394-1411, December.
    12. Meddahi, Nour & Renault, Eric, 2004. "Temporal aggregation of volatility models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 355-379, April.
    13. Bekaert, Geert & Hoerova, Marie, 2014. "The VIX, the variance premium and stock market volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 183(2), pages 181-192.
    14. Andreou, Elena & Ghysels, Eric & Kourtellos, Andros, 2010. "Regression models with mixed sampling frequencies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 158(2), pages 246-261, October.
    15. Amaya, Diego & Christoffersen, Peter & Jacobs, Kris & Vasquez, Aurelio, 2015. "Does realized skewness predict the cross-section of equity returns?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 135-167.
    16. French, Kenneth R. & Schwert, G. William & Stambaugh, Robert F., 1987. "Expected stock returns and volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 3-29, September.
    17. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Meddahi, Nour, 2011. "Realized volatility forecasting and market microstructure noise," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 220-234, January.
    18. Ludvigson, Sydney C. & Ng, Serena, 2007. "The empirical risk-return relation: A factor analysis approach," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 171-222, January.
    19. Fulvio Corsi, 2009. "A Simple Approximate Long-Memory Model of Realized Volatility," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 7(2), pages 174-196, Spring.
    20. Elena Andreou & Eric Ghysels & Andros Kourtellos, 2013. "Should Macroeconomic Forecasters Use Daily Financial Data and How?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 240-251, April.
    21. Xilong Chen & Eric Ghysels, 2011. "News--Good or Bad--and Its Impact on Volatility Predictions over Multiple Horizons," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(1), pages 46-81, October.
    22. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
    23. Ole E. Barndorff‐Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2002. "Econometric analysis of realized volatility and its use in estimating stochastic volatility models," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 64(2), pages 253-280, May.
    24. Bollerslev, Tim & Zhou, Hao, 2002. "Estimating stochastic volatility diffusion using conditional moments of integrated volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 33-65, July.
    25. Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E. & Hansen, Peter Reinhard & Lunde, Asger & Shephard, Neil, 2011. "Subsampling realised kernels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 204-219, January.
    26. Fabio Fornari & Antonio Mele, 2013. "Financial Volatility and Economic Activity," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 155-198, December.
    27. Robert F. Engle & Eric Ghysels & Bumjean Sohn, 2013. "Stock Market Volatility and Macroeconomic Fundamentals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(3), pages 776-797, July.
    28. Schwert, G William, 1989. " Why Does Stock Market Volatility Change over Time?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(5), pages 1115-1153, December.
    29. Leon, Angel & Nave, Juan M. & Rubio, Gonzalo, 2007. "The relationship between risk and expected return in Europe," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 495-512, February.
    30. González, Mariano & Nave, Juan & Rubio, Gonzalo, 2012. "The Cross Section of Expected Returns with MIDAS Betas," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 115-135, February.
    31. Ghysels, Eric & Santa-Clara, Pedro & Valkanov, Rossen, 2006. "Predicting volatility: getting the most out of return data sampled at different frequencies," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 59-95.
    32. Bollerslev, Tim & Zhou, Hao, 2006. "Volatility puzzles: a simple framework for gauging return-volatility regressions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 123-150.
    33. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen, 2004. "Power and Bipower Variation with Stochastic Volatility and Jumps," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 2(1), pages 1-37.
    34. William Schwert, G., 1989. "Business cycles, financial crises, and stock volatility : Reply to Shiller," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 133-137, January.
    35. Bandi, Federico M. & Perron, Benoît, 2008. "Long-run risk-return trade-offs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 143(2), pages 349-374, April.
    36. Ivo Welch & Amit Goyal, 2008. "A Comprehensive Look at The Empirical Performance of Equity Premium Prediction," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(4), pages 1455-1508, July.
    37. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Peter Reinhard Hansen & Asger Lunde & Neil Shephard, 2004. "Regular and Modified Kernel-Based Estimators of Integrated Variance: The Case with Independent Noise," OFRC Working Papers Series 2004fe20, Oxford Financial Research Centre.
    38. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Nour Meddahi, 2004. "Analytical Evaluation Of Volatility Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1079-1110, November.
    39. Ole E. Barndorff‐Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2001. "Non‐Gaussian Ornstein–Uhlenbeck‐based models and some of their uses in financial economics," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 63(2), pages 167-241.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Xu Gong & Boqiang Lin, 2018. "Structural breaks and volatility forecasting in the copper futures market," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 38(3), pages 290-339, March.
    2. Xie, Nan & Wang, Zongrun & Chen, Sicen & Gong, Xu, 2019. "Forecasting downside risk in China’s stock market based on high-frequency data," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 517(C), pages 530-541.
    3. Christian Conrad & Melanie Schienle, 2020. "Testing for an Omitted Multiplicative Long-Term Component in GARCH Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2), pages 229-242, April.
    4. Dhaene, Geert & Wu, Jianbin, 2020. "Incorporating overnight and intraday returns into multivariate GARCH volatility models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 217(2), pages 471-495.
    5. Eunjeong Choi & Soohwan Cho & Dong Keun Kim, 2020. "Power Demand Forecasting using Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) Deep-Learning Model for Monitoring Energy Sustainability," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-14, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Elena Andreou, 2016. "On the use of high frequency measures of volatility in MIDAS regressions," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 03-2016, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    2. Andreou, Elena, 2016. "On the use of high frequency measures of volatility in MIDAS regressions," CEPR Discussion Papers 11307, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Christoffersen, Peter F. & Diebold, Francis X., 2013. "Financial Risk Measurement for Financial Risk Management," Handbook of the Economics of Finance, in: G.M. Constantinides & M. Harris & R. M. Stulz (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Finance, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 1127-1220, Elsevier.
    4. Kim, Jihyun & Meddahi, Nour, 2020. "Volatility regressions with fat tails," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 218(2), pages 690-713.
    5. repec:zbw:cfswop:wp200508 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Peter F. Christoffersen & Francis X. Diebold, 2005. "Volatility Forecasting," PIER Working Paper Archive 05-011, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    7. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Christoffersen, Peter F. & Diebold, Francis X., 2006. "Volatility and Correlation Forecasting," Handbook of Economic Forecasting, in: G. Elliott & C. Granger & A. Timmermann (ed.), Handbook of Economic Forecasting, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 15, pages 777-878, Elsevier.
    8. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2005. "Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics," OFRC Working Papers Series 2005fe08, Oxford Financial Research Centre.
    9. Chun Liu & John M. Maheu, 2009. "Forecasting realized volatility: a Bayesian model-averaging approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(5), pages 709-733.
    10. Corradi, Valentina & Distaso, Walter & Swanson, Norman R., 2009. "Predictive density estimators for daily volatility based on the use of realized measures," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(2), pages 119-138, June.
    11. Bollerslev, Tim & Patton, Andrew J. & Quaedvlieg, Rogier, 2016. "Exploiting the errors: A simple approach for improved volatility forecasting," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 192(1), pages 1-18.
    12. Chauvet, Marcelle & Senyuz, Zeynep & Yoldas, Emre, 2015. "What does financial volatility tell us about macroeconomic fluctuations?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 340-360.
    13. Maheu, John M. & McCurdy, Thomas H., 2011. "Do high-frequency measures of volatility improve forecasts of return distributions?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 69-76, January.
    14. Patton, Andrew J., 2011. "Data-based ranking of realised volatility estimators," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 284-303, April.
    15. Hansen, Peter R. & Lunde, Asger, 2006. "Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 24, pages 127-161, April.
    16. Denisa Banulescu-Radu & Christophe Hurlin & Bertrand Candelon & Sébastien Laurent, 2016. "Do We Need High Frequency Data to Forecast Variances?," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 123-124, pages 135-174.
    17. Liu, Lily Y. & Patton, Andrew J. & Sheppard, Kevin, 2015. "Does anything beat 5-minute RV? A comparison of realized measures across multiple asset classes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 187(1), pages 293-311.
    18. Bollerslev, Tim & Kretschmer, Uta & Pigorsch, Christian & Tauchen, George, 2009. "A discrete-time model for daily S & P500 returns and realized variations: Jumps and leverage effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(2), pages 151-166, June.
    19. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Nour Meddahi, 2004. "Analytical Evaluation Of Volatility Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1079-1110, November.
    20. Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard & Frederiksen, Per, 2008. "Finite sample accuracy and choice of sampling frequency in integrated volatility estimation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 265-286, March.
    21. Valentina Corradi & Norman Swanson & Walter Distaso, 2006. "Predictive Inference for Integrated Volatility," Departmental Working Papers 200616, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    MIDAS regression model; High-frequency volatility estimators; Bias; Efficiency;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:193:y:2016:i:2:p:367-389. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Haili He). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.