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Exploiting the Errors: A Simple Approach for Improved Volatility Forecasting

Author

Listed:
  • Tim Bollerslev

    () (Duke University, NBER and CREATES)

  • Andrew J. Patton

    () (Duke University)

  • Rogier Quaedvlieg

    () (Maastricht University)

Abstract

We propose a new family of easy-to-implement realized volatility based forecasting models. The models exploit the asymptotic theory for high-frequency realized volatility estimation to improve the accuracy of the forecasts. By allowing the parameters of the models to vary explicitly with the (estimated) degree of measurement error, the models exhibit stronger persistence, and in turn generate more responsive forecasts, when the measurement error is relatively low. Implementing the new class of models for the S&P500 equity index and the individual constituents of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, we document significant improvements in the accuracy of the resulting forecasts compared to the forecasts from some of the most popular existing models that implicitly ignore the temporal variation in the magnitude of the realized volatility measurement errors.

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Bollerslev & Andrew J. Patton & Rogier Quaedvlieg, 2015. "Exploiting the Errors: A Simple Approach for Improved Volatility Forecasting," CREATES Research Papers 2015-14, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  • Handle: RePEc:aah:create:2015-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Realized volatility; Forecasting; Measurement Errors; HAR; HARQ;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics

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