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Trade openness, export diversification, and political regimes

Listed author(s):
  • Makhlouf, Yousef
  • Kellard, Neil M.
  • Vinogradov, Dmitri

Recent studies have challenged the view that trade openness leads to more specialization in countries’ trade. Using a panel of 116 countries over 35 years, we show that openness can be positively associated with both specialization and diversification, depending on the measure used. Moreover, for developing countries in our sample, the effect of openness on trade structure depends on the type of political regime: in autocracies openness is linked with specialization, whilst in democracies it is related to diversification via export sophistication.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176515003468
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 136 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 25-27

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:136:y:2015:i:c:p:25-27
DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2015.08.031
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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  7. Steve Dowrick & Jane Golley, 2004. "Trade Openness and Growth: Who Benefits?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 38-56, Spring.
  8. Allen Dennis & Ben Shepherd, 2011. "Trade Facilitation and Export Diversification," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(1), pages 101-122, 01.
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  11. José Cheibub & Jennifer Gandhi & James Vreeland, 2010. "Democracy and dictatorship revisited," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 67-101, April.
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