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The short and the long run relationship between fiscal decentralization and public expenditure composition in Italy

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  • Grisorio, Maria Jennifer
  • Prota, Francesco

Abstract

This article is an original contribution to the understanding of the relationship between fiscal decentralization and public expenditure composition. Relying on recent panel cointegration techniques, our findings show that the level of decentralization influences the expenditure composition of the Italian regional administrations in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Grisorio, Maria Jennifer & Prota, Francesco, 2015. "The short and the long run relationship between fiscal decentralization and public expenditure composition in Italy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 113-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:130:y:2015:i:c:p:113-116
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2015.03.021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Joakim Westerlund, 2007. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(6), pages 709-748, December.
    3. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
    4. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
    5. Damiaan Persyn & Joakim Westerlund, 2008. "Error-correction–based cointegration tests for panel data," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(2), pages 232-241, June.
    6. Jon H. Fiva, 2006. "New Evidence on the Effect of Fiscal Decentralization on the Size and Composition of Government Spending," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 62(2), pages 250-280, June.
    7. Kappeler, Andreas & Välilä, Timo, 2008. "Fiscal federalism and the composition of public investment in Europe," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 562-570, September.
    8. Kneller, Richard & Bleaney, Michael F. & Gemmell, Norman, 1999. "Fiscal policy and growth: evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 171-190, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:asieco:v:56:y:2018:i:c:p:24-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hakhu, Antra Bhatt, 2015. "Productive Public Expenditure and Debt Dynamics: An Error Correction Representation using Indian Data," Working Papers 15/149, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    3. Raffaele Lagravinese & Paolo Liberati & Agnese Sacchi, 2016. "The growth and variability of local taxes: An application to the Italian regions," Working Papers. Collection B: Regional and sectoral economics 1601, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.
    4. Cavalieri, Marina & Ferrante, Livio, 2016. "Does fiscal decentralization improve health outcomes? Evidence from infant mortality in Italy," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 74-88.
    5. Maria Jennifer Grisorio & Francesco Prota, 2016. "Public expenditure in time of crisis: are Italian policymakers choosing the right mix?," Working Papers. Collection B: Regional and sectoral economics 1602, Universidade de Vigo, GEN - Governance and Economics research Network.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal federalism; Composition of government expenditure; Panel cointegration;

    JEL classification:

    • H72 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Budget and Expenditures
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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