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About time: Daylight Saving Time transition and individual well-being

  • Kountouris, Yiannis
  • Remoundou, Kyriaki
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    Daylight Saving Time is controversial due to its alleged negative impact on individual well-being. Using panel data from Germany we find evidence that the transition to summer time has negative influence on general life satisfaction and mood, which is stronger for those in full time employment.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 122 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 100-103

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:122:y:2014:i:1:p:100-103
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    1. Kellogg, Ryan & Wolff, Hendrik, 2008. "Daylight time and energy: Evidence from an Australian experiment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 207-220, November.
    2. Kamstra, M.J. & Kramer, L.A. & Levi, M.D., 1998. "Losing Sleep at the Market: The Daylight-Savings Anomaly," Discussion Papers dp98-04, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    3. Taylor, Mark P., 2002. "Tell me why I don't like Mondays: investigating day of the week effects on job satisfaction and psychological well-being," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Paul Frijters, 2004. "How Important is Methodology for the estimates of the determinants of Happiness?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(497), pages 641-659, 07.
    5. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Putting Different Price Tags on the Same Health Condition: Re-evaluating the Well-Being Valuation Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 5493, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz - Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets: An Example Using the German SOEP," Data Documentation 53, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Bruno Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2009. "The life satisfaction approach to valuing public goods: The case of terrorism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 317-345, March.
    8. Matthew J. Kotchen & Laura E. Grant, 2008. "Does Daylight Saving Time Save Energy? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Indiana," NBER Working Papers 14429, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Dolan, Paul & Peasgood, Tessa & White, Mathew, 2008. "Do we really know what makes us happy A review of the economic literature on the factors associated with subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-122, February.
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