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Can you trust survey responses? Evidence using objective health measures

  • Suziedelyte, Agne
  • Johar, Meliyanni

We investigate the common assumption in applied research that reporting errors are negligible in variables where there is no clear incentive for misreporting. Using major medical operations, we find high misreporting rates, but the coefficients of their predictors remain unbiased.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 121 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 163-166

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:121:y:2013:i:2:p:163-166
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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  1. Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2005. "The Relationship Between Education and Adult Mortality in the United States," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 189-221.
  2. Butler, J S, et al, 1987. "Measurement Error in Self-reported Health Variables," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(4), pages 644-50, November.
  3. Kreider, Brent & Pepper, John V., 2007. "Disability and Employment: Reevaluating the Evidence in Light of Reporting Errors," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 102, pages 432-441, June.
  4. Meliyanni Johar & Elizabeth Savage & Olena Stavrunova & Glenn Jones & Michael Keane, 2012. "Geographic Differences in Hospital Waiting Times," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(281), pages 165-181, 06.
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  7. Janet Currie, 2009. "Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Socioeconomic Status, Poor Health in Childhood, and Human Capital Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 87-122, March.
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  9. Debra Sabatini Dwyer & Olivia S. Mitchell, 1998. "Health Problems as Determinants of Retirement: Are Self-Rated Measures Endogenous?," NBER Working Papers 6503, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Gabriella Conti & James Heckman & Sergio Urzua, 2010. "The Education-Health Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 234-38, May.
  11. Brownstone, David & Valletta, Robert G, 1996. "Modeling Earnings Measurement Error: A Multiple Imputation Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 705-17, November.
  12. Timothy Erickson & Toni M. Whited, 2000. "Measurement Error and the Relationship between Investment and q," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(5), pages 1027-1057, October.
  13. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
  14. Akee, Randall, 2011. "Errors in self-reported earnings: The role of previous earnings volatility and individual characteristics," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 409-421, November.
  15. Bound, John & Brown, Charles & Mathiowetz, Nancy, 2001. "Measurement error in survey data," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 59, pages 3705-3843 Elsevier.
  16. Brownstone, David & Velletta, Robert G., 1996. "Modeling Earnings Measurement Error: A Multiple Imputation Approach," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2t08s22q, University of California Transportation Center.
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