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Sustainable Paper Consumption: Exploring Behavioral Factors

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  • Bertha Maya Sopha

    () (Industrial Engineering Programme, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia)

Abstract

Although the paperless office (PLO) management system has been established with the goal of paper usage reduction, demand for paper has still showed an uptrend over the years. Given the substantial pressure on forest ecosystems due to a continued increase of paper consumption, understanding the behavioral aspects of paper consumption is, therefore, required. This present paper aims at exploring the factors underlying paper consumption behavior. Empirical data was acquired through a survey of 266 Indonesian students, involving both undergraduate and postgraduate students. A theoretical model, based on the Comprehensive Action Determination Model (CADM), was tested against the empirical data. It was found that the model received reasonable support from the data. Results indicate that reducing paper consumption behavior is strongly influenced by habit and, marginally significant, by intention. Furthermore, habit formation is influenced by both normative processes and situational influences. The results, to some extent, explain the PLO paradox in a way that the PLO program should have focused on breaking the habit of paper usage instead of promoting the benefits of PLO. Introducing a paper quota and rationing (fee) to new students, as the main target, is a potential policy intervention implied from the results.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertha Maya Sopha, 2013. "Sustainable Paper Consumption: Exploring Behavioral Factors," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(4), pages 1-14, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:2:y:2013:i:4:p:270-283:d:30291
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    behavioral factors; paper consumption; Indonesian students; PLO paradox;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching
    • B - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology
    • N - Economic History
    • P - Economic Systems
    • Y80 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines - - - Related Disciplines
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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