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Agne Suziedelyte

Personal Details

First Name:Agne
Middle Name:
Last Name:Suziedelyte
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psu352
https://sites.google.com/site/agnesuziedelyte/
Terminal Degree:2012 School of Economics; UNSW Business School; UNSW Sydney (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
City University

London, United Kingdom
http://www.city.ac.uk/arts-social-sciences/economics
RePEc:edi:decituk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mendolia, Silvia & Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2021. "Have Girls Been Left behind during the COVID-19 Pandemic? Gender Differences in Pandemic Effects on Children's Mental Wellbeing," IZA Discussion Papers 14665, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "World Commodity Prices, Job Security and Health: Evidence from the Mining Industry," IZA Discussion Papers 11251, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. Prashant Bharadwaj & Mallesh M. Pai & Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Mental Health Stigma," NBER Working Papers 21240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Victimisation, Wellbeing and Compensation: Using Panel Data to Estimate the Costs of Violent Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 9311, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  5. David W. Johnston & Grace Lordan & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2014. "Education and Health Knowledge: Evidence from UK Compulsory Schooling Reforms," CEP Discussion Papers dp1297, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  6. Denise Doiron & Denzil G Fiebig & Agne Suziedelyte, 2013. "Hips and hearts: the variation in incentive effects of insurance across hospital procedures," Discussion Papers 2013-14, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  7. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "Can video games affect children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills?," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  8. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "The effects of old and new media on children's weight," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  9. Agne Suziedelyte, 2010. "Effect of Internet Health Information on Health Care Use," Discussion Papers 2010-29, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

Articles

  1. Mendolia, Silvia & Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2022. "Have girls been left behind during the COVID-19 pandemic? Gender differences in pandemic effects on children’s mental wellbeing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 214(C).
  2. Suziedelyte, Agne, 2021. "Is it only a game? Video games and violence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 105-125.
  3. Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2021. "The intergenerational impact of reduced generosity in the social safety net," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 192(C), pages 1-24.
  4. David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2020. "Macroeconomic Shocks, Job Security, and Health," American Journal of Health Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 348-371.
  5. David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2018. "Victimisation, Well†being and Compensation: Using Panel Data to Estimate the Costs of Violent Crime," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(611), pages 1545-1569, June.
  6. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Justification bias in self-reported disability: New evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-134.
  7. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.
  8. Bharadwaj, Prashant & Pai, Mallesh M. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Mental health stigma," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 57-60.
  9. Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Media And Human Capital Development: Can Video Game Playing Make You Smarter?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(2), pages 1140-1155, April.
  10. Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2015. "Does early schooling narrow outcome gaps for advantaged and disadvantaged children?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 76-88.
  11. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Education and health knowledge: Evidence from UK compulsory schooling reform," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 92-100.
  12. Denise Doiron & Denzil G. Fiebig & Meliyanni Johar & Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Does self-assessed health measure health?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 180-194, January.
  13. Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "The effects of old and new media on children's weight," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(10), pages 1008-1018, February.
  14. Doiron, Denise & Fiebig, Denzil G. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2014. "Hips and hearts: The variation in incentive effects of insurance across hospital procedures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 81-97.
  15. Suziedelyte, Agne & Johar, Meliyanni, 2013. "Can you trust survey responses? Evidence using objective health measures," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 163-166.
  16. Suziedelyte, Agne, 2012. "How does searching for health information on the Internet affect individuals' demand for health care services?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1828-1835.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Mendolia, Silvia & Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2021. "Have Girls Been Left behind during the COVID-19 Pandemic? Gender Differences in Pandemic Effects on Children's Mental Wellbeing," IZA Discussion Papers 14665, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Werner, Katharina & Wößmann, Ludger, 2022. "The Legacy of COVID-19 in Education," VfS Annual Conference 2022 (Basel): Big Data in Economics 264106, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

  2. Prashant Bharadwaj & Mallesh M. Pai & Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Mental Health Stigma," NBER Working Papers 21240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher J. Beedie & Andrew M. Lane & Robert Udberg & Peter C. Terry, 2022. "The 4R Model of Mood and Emotion for Sustainable Mental Health in Organisational Settings," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(18), pages 1-28, September.
    2. Nie, Peng & Wang, Lu & Dragone, Davide & Lu, Haiyang & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2021. ""The Better You Feel, the Harder You Fall": Health Perception Biases and Mental Health among Chinese Adults during the COVID-19 Pandemic," IZA Discussion Papers 14905, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Forsstrom, Matthew P., 2021. "Abortion Costs and Single Parenthood: A Life-Cycle Model of Fertility and Partnership Behavior," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(C).
    4. Jan van Ours, 2020. "What a drag it is getting old? Mental health and loneliness beyond age 50," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 20-075/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Chee‐Ruey Hsieh & Xuezheng Qin, 2018. "Depression hurts, depression costs: The medical spending attributable to depression and depressive symptoms in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 525-544, March.
    6. Dahmann, Sarah C. & Schnitzlein, Daniel D., 2019. "No evidence for a protective effect of education on mental health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 241(C).
    7. Islam, Asadul & Pakrashi, Debayan & Vlassopoulos, Michael & Wang, Liang Choon, 2020. "Stigma and Misconceptions in the Time of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Field Experiment in India," IZA Discussion Papers 13995, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Di Novi, Cinzia & Leporatti, Lucia & Montefiori, Marcello, 2021. "The role of education in psychological response to adverse health shocks," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 125(5), pages 643-650.
    9. Jorge M. Agüero & Veronica Frisancho, 2020. "Measuring Violence Against Women with Experimental Methods," Working papers 2020-14, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    10. Marcus T. Wolfe & Pankaj C. Patel & Will Drover, 2020. "The Influence of Hypomania Symptoms on Income in Self-Employment," Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, , vol. 44(3), pages 422-450, May.
    11. Edward N. Okeke, 2021. "Money and my mind: Maternal cash transfers and mental health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(11), pages 2879-2904, November.
    12. Brad M. Barber & Wei Jiang & Adair Morse & Manju Puri & Heather Tookes & Ingrid M. Werner, 2021. "What Explains Differences in Finance Research Productivity During the Pandemic?," NBER Working Papers 28493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Prashant Bharadwaj & Mallesh M. Pai & Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Mental Health Stigma," NBER Working Papers 21240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Hummels, David & Munch, Jakob & Xiang, Chong, 2015. "No Pain, No Gain: The Effects of Exports on Job Injury and Sickness," 2015: Trade and Societal Well-Being, December 13-15, 2015, Clearwater Beach, Florida 229253, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    15. Elena Lagomarsino & Alessandro Spiganti, 2020. "No gain in pain: psychological well-being, participation, and wages in the BHPS," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 21(9), pages 1375-1389, December.
    16. Benedikt Janzen, 2022. "Temperature and Mental Health: Evidence from Helpline Calls," Papers 2207.04992, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2022.
    17. Monica Harber Carney, 2021. "The impact of mental health parity laws on birth outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(4), pages 748-765, April.
    18. Eduardo Ignacio Polo-Muro, 2021. "The effect of labor market shocks on mental health outcomes: evidence from the Spanish Great Recession," Working Papers 21.08, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
    19. Sarah Brown & Mark N. Harris & Preety Srivastava & Karl Taylor, 2018. "Mental Health and Reporting Bias: Analysis of the GHQ - 12," Working Papers 2018013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    20. Jill Furzer & Elizabeth Dhuey & Audrey Laporte, 2022. "ADHD misdiagnosis: Causes and mitigators," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(9), pages 1926-1953, September.
    21. Ruheng Yin & Rui Tian & Jing Wu & Feng Gan, 2022. "Exploring the Factors Associated with Mental Health Attitude in China: A Structural Topic Modeling Approach," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 19(19), pages 1-15, October.
    22. Hummels, David & Munch, Jakob R. & Xiang, Chong, 2016. "No Pain, No Gain: The Effects of Exports on Effort, Injury, and Illness," IZA Discussion Papers 10036, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    23. David Hummels & Jakob Munch & Chong Xiang, 2016. "No Pain, No Gain: Work Demand, Work Effort, and Worker Health," NBER Working Papers 22365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Qin, Xuezheng & Wang, Suyin & Hsieh, Chee-Ruey, 2018. "The prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms among adults in China: Estimation based on a National Household Survey," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 271-282.
    25. Elizabeth A. Minton, 2022. "Pandemics and consumers' mental well‐being," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 5-14, March.
    26. Cullen,Claire Alexis, 2020. "Method Matters : Underreporting of Intimate Partner Violence in Nigeria and Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9274, The World Bank.
    27. Jakub S. Bil & Bartłomiej Buława & Jakub Świerzawski, 2021. "Mental Health and the City in the Post-COVID-19 Era," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(14), pages 1-14, July.
    28. Kino, Shiho & Nishioka, Daisuke & Ueno, Keiko & Saito, Masashige & Kondo, Naoki, 2022. "Changes in social relationships by the initiation and termination of public assistance in the older Japanese population: A JAGES panel study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 293(C).
    29. Bogliacino, Francesco & codagnone, cristiano & Folkvord, F. & Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco, 2022. "The impact of labour market shocks on mental health: evidence from the COVID-19 first wave," SocArXiv wx9d4, Center for Open Science.
    30. van Ooijen, R. & Alessi, R. & Knoef, M., 2015. "Health status over the life cycle," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 15/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  3. Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Victimisation, Wellbeing and Compensation: Using Panel Data to Estimate the Costs of Violent Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 9311, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Frijters, Paul & Krekel, Christian & Ulker, Aydogan, 2020. "Machiavelli versus concave utility functions: should bads be spread out or concentrated?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108421, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Prakash, Kushneel & Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Smyth, Russell, 2020. "Petrol prices and subjective wellbeing," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C).
    3. Anna Bindler & Nadine Ketel, 2022. "Scaring or Scarring? Labor Market Effects of Criminal Victimization," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(4), pages 939-970.
    4. Ummad Mazhar, 2021. "Women empowerment and insecurity: firm-level evidence," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 56(1), pages 43-53, January.
    5. Paul Frijters & Andrew E. Clark & Christian Krekel & Richard Layard, 2020. "A Happy Choice: Wellbeing as the Goal of Government," Post-Print halshs-02492628, HAL.
    6. Sebastian Galiani & Laura Jaitman & Federico Weinschelbaum, 2018. "Crime and Durable Goods," Documentos de Trabajo LACEA 016419, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA.
    7. Hailemariam, Abebe & Sakutukwa, Tutsirai & Yew, Siew Ling, 2021. "The impact of energy poverty on physical violence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C).
    8. Freitas-Monteiro, Teresa & Ludolph, Lars, 2021. "Barriers to humanitarian migration, victimisation and integration outcomes: evidence from Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 110500, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. David W. Johnston & Olena Stavrunova, 2021. "Subjective Wellbeing Dynamics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 54(4), pages 518-529, December.
    10. Clark, Andrew E. & D'Ambrosio, Conchita & Zhu, Rong, 2019. "Crime Victimisation Over Time and Sleep Quality," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1901, CEPREMAP.
    11. Abi Adams-Prassl & Kristiina Huttunen & Emily Nix & Ning Zhang, 2022. "Violence against women at work," Economics Series Working Papers 979, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    12. Matthew Manning & Christopher M. Fleming & Hien-Thuc Pham & Gabriel T. W. Wong, 2022. "What Matters More, Perceived or Real Crime?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 163(3), pages 1221-1248, October.
    13. Mendolia, Silvia & McNamee, Paul & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2018. "The Transmission of Mental Health within Households: Does One Partner's Mental Health Influence the Other Partner's Life Satisfaction?," IZA Discussion Papers 11431, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Johnston, David & Onder, Yasin Kursat & Rahman, Habibur & Ulubasoglu, Mehmet, 2021. "Evaluating Wildfire Exposure: Using Wellbeing Data to Estimate and Value the Impacts of Wildfire," MPRA Paper 109652, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Michael Palmer & Jenny Williams & Barbara McPake, 2019. "Standard of Living and Disability in Cambodia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(11), pages 2382-2402, November.

  4. David W. Johnston & Grace Lordan & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2014. "Education and Health Knowledge: Evidence from UK Compulsory Schooling Reforms," CEP Discussion Papers dp1297, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Janke, Katharina & Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2018. "The Causal Effect of Education on Chronic Health Conditions," IZA Discussion Papers 11353, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Roman Hoffmann & Sebastian Uljas Lutz, 2019. "The health knowledge mechanism: evidence on the link between education and health lifestyle in the Philippines," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 20(1), pages 27-43, February.
    3. Setti Rais Ali & Paul Dourgnon & Lise Rochaix, 2018. "Social Capital or Education: What Matters Most to Cut Time to Diagnosis?," PSE Working Papers halshs-01703170, HAL.
    4. Stephanie von Hinke, 2021. "Education, dietary intakes and exercise," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 21/748, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Avendano, M.; de Coulon, A.; Nafilyan, V.;, 2017. "Does more education always improve mental health? Evidence from a British compulsory schooling reform," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/10, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Hamad, Rita & Elser, Holly & Tran, Duy C. & Rehkopf, David H. & Goodman, Steven N., 2018. "How and why studies disagree about the effects of education on health: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of compulsory schooling laws," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 212(C), pages 168-178.
    7. Janke, Katharina & Johnston, David & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael, 2019. "The causal effect of education on chronic health conditions in the UK," CEPR Discussion Papers 14084, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Jürges Hendrik & Meyer Sophie-Charlotte, 2020. "Educational Differences in Smoking: Selection Versus Causation," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 240(4), pages 467-492, August.
    9. Mustafa Özer & Jan Fidrmuc & Mehmet Ali Eryurt, 2017. "Does Maternal Education Affect Childhood Immunization Rates? Evidence from Turkey," CESifo Working Paper Series 6439, CESifo.
    10. Avendano, Mauricio & de Coulon, Augustin & Nafilyan, Vahé, 2020. "Does longer compulsory schooling affect mental health? Evidence from a British reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).
    11. Sylwia Kałucka & Dorota Kaleta & Teresa Makowiec-Dabrowska, 2019. "Prevalence of Dietary Behavior and Determinants of Quality of Diet among Beneficiaries of Government Welfare Assistance in Poland," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 16(3), pages 1-18, February.
    12. Courtin, Emilie & Nafilyan, Vahe & Avendano, Mauricio & Meneton, Pierre & Berkman, Lisa F. & Goldberg, Marcel & Zins, Marie & Dowd, Jennifer B., 2019. "Longer schooling but not better off? A quasi-experimental study of the effect of compulsory schooling on biomarkers in France," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 220(C), pages 379-386.
    13. Bijwaard, G.E.; & Jones, A.M.;, 2019. "Education and life-expectancy and how the relationship is mediated through changes in behaviour: a principal stratification approach for hazard rates," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 19/05, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  5. Denise Doiron & Denzil G Fiebig & Agne Suziedelyte, 2013. "Hips and hearts: the variation in incentive effects of insurance across hospital procedures," Discussion Papers 2013-14, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Nathan Kettlewell, 2019. "Utilization and Selection in an Ancillaries Health Insurance Market," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 86(4), pages 989-1017, December.
    2. Papanicolas, Irene & McGuire, Alistair, 2015. "Do financial incentives trump clinical guidance? Hip Replacement in England and Scotland," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 25-36.
    3. Denise Doiron & Nathan Kettlewell, 2020. "Family formation and the demand for health insurance," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 523-533, April.
    4. Denzil G. Fiebig, 2017. "Big Data: Will It Improve Patient-Centered Care?," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;International Academy of Health Preference Research, vol. 10(2), pages 133-139, April.
    5. Denise Doiron & Nathan Kettlewell, 2018. "The Effect of Health Insurance on the Substitution between Public and Private Hospital Care," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 94(305), pages 135-154, June.

  6. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "Can video games affect children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills?," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Brand Forero, 2018. "El impacto de los videojuegos sobre las habilidades cognitivas de ninos y adolecentes en Colombia," Revista Economía y Región, Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar, vol. 12(1), pages 65-93, June.

  7. Agne Suziedelyte, 2012. "The effects of old and new media on children's weight," Discussion Papers 2012-37, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

    Cited by:

    1. Suziedelyte, Agne, 2021. "Is it only a game? Video games and violence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 105-125.

Articles

  1. Mendolia, Silvia & Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2022. "Have girls been left behind during the COVID-19 pandemic? Gender differences in pandemic effects on children’s mental wellbeing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 214(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2020. "Macroeconomic Shocks, Job Security, and Health," American Journal of Health Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 348-371.

    Cited by:

    1. Ahammer, Alexander & Grübl, Dominik & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2020. "The health externalities of downsizing," CEPR Discussion Papers 15588, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Avdic, Daniel & de New, Sonja C. & Kamhöfer, Daniel A., 2021. "Economic downturns and mental health in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 140(C).
    3. Botha, Ferdi & Nguyen, Viet H., 2022. "Opposite nonlinear effects of unemployment and sentiment on male and female suicide rates: Evidence from Australia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 292(C).
    4. Ferdi Botha & Viet H. Nguyen, 2021. "Opposite Nonlinear Effects of Unemployment and Sentiment on Male and Female Suicide Rates: Evidence from Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2021n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Dain Jung & Do Won Kwak & Kam Ki Tang & Myra Yazbeck, 2021. "How Do Job Conditions Amplify the Impacts of Mental Health Shocks?," Discussion Papers Series 647, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    6. Christoph Kronenberg, 2021. "New(spaper) evidence of a reduction in suicide mentions during the 19th century US gold rush," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(10), pages 2582-2594, September.

  3. David W. Johnston & Michael A. Shields & Agne Suziedelyte, 2018. "Victimisation, Well†being and Compensation: Using Panel Data to Estimate the Costs of Violent Crime," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(611), pages 1545-1569, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Justification bias in self-reported disability: New evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-134.

    Cited by:

    1. Davillas, Apostolos & Burlinson, Andrew & Liu, Hui-Hsuan, 2022. "Getting warmer: Fuel poverty, objective and subjective health and well-being," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C).
    2. Bauer, Ann Barbara & Eichenberger, Reiner, 2021. "Worsening workers' health by lowering retirement age: The malign consequences of a benign reform," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 18(C).
    3. Rose, Liam, 2020. "Retirement and health: Evidence from England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    4. Yuda, Michio, 2020. "Childhood health and future outcomes: Evidence from panel surveys for the Japanese population," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C).
    5. Davillas, A.; & de Oliveira, V.H.; & Jones, A.M.;, 2022. "Is inconsistent reporting of self-assessed health persistent and systematic? Evidence from the UKHLS," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 22/05, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Frimmel, Wolfgang & Halla, Martin & Paetzold, Jörg & Schmieder, Julia, 2020. "Health of Elderly Parents, Their Children's Labor Supply, and the Role of Migrant Care Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 13774, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Katie M. Jajtner & Sophie Mitra & Christine Fountain & Austin Nichols, 2020. "Rising Income Inequality Through a Disability Lens: Trends in the United States 1981–2018," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 151(1), pages 81-114, August.
    8. Cheny, L.; & Clarke, P.M.; & Petrie, D.J.; & Staub, K.E.;, 2018. "The effects of self-assessed health: Dealing with and understanding misclassification bias," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/26, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    9. Melanie Jones & Kim Hoque & Victoria Wass & Nick Bacon, 2021. "Inequality and the Economic Cycle: Disabled Employees’ Experience of Work during the Great Recession in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 59(3), pages 788-815, September.
    10. Davillas, A & Burlinson, A. & Liu, H-H., 2021. "Getting warmer: fuel poverty, objective and subjective health and well-being," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 21/13, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    11. Mark N. Harris & Xueyan Zhao & Eugenio Zucchelli, 2021. "Ageing Workforces, Ill‐health and Multi‐state Labour Market Transitions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 83(1), pages 199-227, February.
    12. Davillas, Apostolos & Burlinson, Andrew & Liu, Hui-Hsuan, 2021. "Getting warmer: fuel poverty, objective and subjective health and well-being," GLO Discussion Paper Series 903, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    13. Gibson, Grant & Clair, Luc, 2019. "O brother how art thou: Propensity to report self-assessed unmet need," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 243(C).
    14. Syed Afroz Keramat & Khorshed Alam & Jeff Gow & Stuart J H Biddle, 2020. "Gender differences in the longitudinal association between obesity, and disability with workplace absenteeism in the Australian working population," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(5), pages 1-14, May.

  5. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.

    Cited by:

    1. Spitzer, Sonja & Shaikh, Mujaheed, 2022. "Health misperception and healthcare utilisation among older Europeans," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 22(C).
    2. Urwin, Sean & Lau, Yiu-Shing & Grande, Gunn & Sutton, Matt, 2021. "The extent and predictors of discrepancy between provider and recipient reports of informal caregiving," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 277(C).
    3. Nesson, Erik T. & Robinson, Joshua J., 2019. "On the measurement of health and its effect on the measurement of health inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 207-221.
    4. Davillas, A.; & de Oliveira, V.H.; & Jones, A.M.;, 2022. "Is inconsistent reporting of self-assessed health persistent and systematic? Evidence from the UKHLS," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 22/05, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Cheny, L.; & Clarke, P.M.; & Petrie, D.J.; & Staub, K.E.;, 2018. "The effects of self-assessed health: Dealing with and understanding misclassification bias," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/26, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. David W. Johnston & Claryn S. J. Kung & Michael A. Shields, 2021. "Who is resilient in a time of crisis? The importance of financial and non‐financial resources," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(12), pages 3051-3073, December.
    7. Perales, Francisco, 2018. "The cognitive roots of prejudice towards same-sex couples: An analysis of an Australian national sample," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 117-127.
    8. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Siew Ling Yew & Thi Minh Thu Nguyen, 2022. "Health status and housing tenure decisions of older Australians," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 50(4), pages 966-989, December.
    9. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Smyth, Russell, 2021. "Energy poverty and health: Panel data evidence from Australia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(C).

  6. Bharadwaj, Prashant & Pai, Mallesh M. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Mental health stigma," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 57-60.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Media And Human Capital Development: Can Video Game Playing Make You Smarter?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(2), pages 1140-1155, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Palsson, Craig, 2017. "Smartphones and child injuries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 200-213.
    2. Sandra L. Hofferth & David S. Bickham & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Pamela E. Davis-Kean & Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, 2018. "Contributions of Research Based on the PSID Child Development Supplement," The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , vol. 680(1), pages 97-131, November.
    3. Suziedelyte, Agne, 2021. "Is it only a game? Video games and violence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 105-125.
    4. Shu Hu & Zheng Mu, 2020. "Some Time is Better Spent than Other Time: Chinese Adolescents’ Time Use and Developmental Outcomes," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(5), pages 1739-1765, October.
    5. Ward, Michael R., 2018. "“Cutting class to play video games”," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 11-19.
    6. McNamee, Paul & Mendolia, Silvia & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2021. "Social media use and emotional and behavioural outcomes in adolescence: Evidence from British longitudinal data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C).

  8. Suziedelyte, Agne & Zhu, Anna, 2015. "Does early schooling narrow outcome gaps for advantaged and disadvantaged children?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 76-88.

    Cited by:

    1. Pauline Givord, 2021. "How age at school entry affects future educational and socioemotional outcomes: Evidence from PISA," Sciences Po publications 120, Sciences Po.
    2. Daniel Rakotomalala, 2021. "The effects of age on educational performances at the end of primary school : cross-sectional and regression discontinuity approach applications from Reunion Island," Working Papers hal-03243392, HAL.
    3. María Jesús Mancebón Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & Adriano Villar-Aldonza, 2018. "Evaluación del efecto de la escolarización temprana sobre las habilidades cognitivas y no cognitivas de los niños de cinco/seis años," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 226(3), pages 123-153, September.
    4. Beatton, Tony & Kidd, Michael & Niu, Anthony & Vella, Francis, 2021. "Age of Starting School, Academic Performance, and the Impact of Non-Compliance: An Experiment within an Experiment, Evidence from Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 14168, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Pauline GIVORD, 2020. "How age at entry at school affects future educational and socio-emotional outcomes: evidence from PISA," Working Papers 2020-27, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    6. Ryan, Chris & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "Sibling Health, Schooling and Longer-Term Developmental Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 10253, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Daniel Rakotomalala, 2020. "The effects of age on educational performances at the end of primary school : cross-sectional and regression discontinuity approach applications from Reunion Island," TEPP Working Paper 2020-06, TEPP.
    8. Youwei Wang & Yuxin Chen & Yi Qian, 2018. "The Causal Link between Relative Age Effect and Entrepreneurship: Evidence from 17 Million Users across 49 Years on Taobao," NBER Working Papers 25318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Goncalo Lima & Luis Catela Nunes & Ana Balcao Reis & Maria do Carmo Seabra, 2022. "No country for young kids? The effects of school starting age throughout childhood and beyond," Nova SBE Working Paper Series wp639, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Nova School of Business and Economics.

  9. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Education and health knowledge: Evidence from UK compulsory schooling reform," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 92-100.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  10. Denise Doiron & Denzil G. Fiebig & Meliyanni Johar & Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "Does self-assessed health measure health?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 180-194, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Yumi Ishikawa & Miki Kohara & Aya Nushimoto, 2022. "Job stress and mental health among social workers: evidence from a field experiment at a public employment support institution in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 73(1), pages 123-146, January.
    2. Beatty, Timothy K.M. & Ritter, Joseph A., 2018. "Measuring the Health Cost of Prolonged Unemployment: Evidence from the Great Recession," Staff Papers 280435, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    3. Davillas, Apostolos & Pudney, Stephen, 2018. "Biomarkers as precursors of disability," ISER Working Paper Series 2018-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Karlsson, Martin & Klohn, Florian & Rickayzen, Ben, 2018. "The role of heterogeneous parameters for the detection of selection in insurance contracts," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 110-121.
    5. Valerii Baidin & Christopher J. Gerry & Maria Kaneva, 2021. "How Self-Rated is Self-Rated Health? Exploring the Role of Individual and Institutional Factors in Reporting Heterogeneity in Russia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 155(2), pages 675-696, June.
    6. Prakash, Kushneel & Munyanyi, Musharavati Ephraim, 2021. "Energy poverty and obesity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    7. Leonardo Becchetti & Maria Bachelet & Fabiola Riccardini, 2018. "Not feeling well … true or exaggerated? Self‐assessed health as a leading health indicator," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 153-170, February.
    8. Petra Maresova & Blanka Klimova & Kamil Kuca, 2016. "Financial and legislative aspects of drug development of orphan diseases on the European market -- a systematic review," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(27), pages 2562-2570, June.
    9. Kovacic, Matija & Orso, Cristina Elisa, 2022. "Trends in inequality of opportunity in health over the life cycle: The role of early-life conditions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 201(C), pages 60-82.
    10. Christian Bünnings, 2017. "Does new health information affect health behaviour? The effect of health events on smoking cessation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 987-1000, February.
    11. Cheny, L.; & Clarke, P.M.; & Petrie, D.J.; & Staub, K.E.;, 2018. "The effects of self-assessed health: Dealing with and understanding misclassification bias," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/26, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    12. Bérengère Davin & Xavier Joutard & Alain Paraponaris, 2019. "“If You Were Me”: Proxy Respondents’ Biases in Population Health Surveys," AMSE Working Papers 1905, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    13. Cheng, Zhiming & Wang, Ben Zhe & Taksa, Lucy, 2017. "Labour Force Participation and Employment of Humanitarian Migrants: Evidence from the Building a New Life in Australia Longitudinal Data," GLO Discussion Paper Series 106, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    14. Le, Huong & Nguyen, Ha, 2015. "Parental health and children’s cognitive and non-cognitive development: New evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children," MPRA Paper 67590, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Kushneel Prakash & Sanjesh Kumar, 2021. "“Smoking your child’s job away”: Parental smoking during one’s childhood and the probability of being employed in adulthood," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2021n13, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    16. Leonardo Becchetti & Maria Bachelet & Fabio Pisani, 2019. "Poor eudaimonic subjective wellbeing as a mortality risk factor," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 36(1), pages 245-272, April.
    17. Ricky N. Lawton & Iulian Gramatki & Will Watt & Daniel Fujiwara, 2021. "Does Volunteering Make Us Happier, or Are Happier People More Likely to Volunteer? Addressing the Problem of Reverse Causality When Estimating the Wellbeing Impacts of Volunteering," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 599-624, February.
    18. Bousmah, Marwân-al-Qays & Combes, Jean-Baptiste Simon & Abu-Zaineh, Mohammad, 2019. "Health differentials between citizens and immigrants in Europe: A heterogeneous convergence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 235-243.
    19. Xiaoxue Li & Sarah S. Stith, 2020. "Health insurance and self‐assessed health: New evidence from Affordable Care Act repeal fear," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(9), pages 1078-1085, September.
    20. Anthony Lepinteur, 2018. "The Asymmetric Experience of Gains and Losses in Job Security on Health," DEM Discussion Paper Series 18-16, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.
    21. Wang, Haining & Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2019. "Health outcomes, health inequality and Mandarin proficiency in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 1-1.
    22. Kokot, Johanna, 2017. "Does a spouse's health shock influence the partner's risk attitudes?," Ruhr Economic Papers 707, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

  11. Agne Suziedelyte, 2015. "The effects of old and new media on children's weight," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(10), pages 1008-1018, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  12. Doiron, Denise & Fiebig, Denzil G. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2014. "Hips and hearts: The variation in incentive effects of insurance across hospital procedures," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 81-97.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  13. Suziedelyte, Agne & Johar, Meliyanni, 2013. "Can you trust survey responses? Evidence using objective health measures," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 163-166.

    Cited by:

    1. Nakamura, Sayaka, 2014. "Parental income and child health in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 42-55.
    2. John Cawley & Anna Choi, 2015. "Health Disparities Across Education: The Role of Differential Reporting Error," NBER Working Papers 21317, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Perry Singleton & Ling Li, 2016. "A Framework for Measurement Error in Self-Reported Health Conditions," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 191, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    4. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Who provides inconsistent reports of their health status? The importance of age, cognitive ability and socioeconomic status," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 191(C), pages 9-18.
    5. Lee, Yong-Woo, 2016. "State Dependence, Unobserved Heterogeneity, And Health Dynamics In Korea," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 57(2), pages 195-221, December.
    6. Harris, Matthew C., 2017. "Imperfect information on physical activity and caloric intake," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 112-125.
    7. Ilke Onur & Malathi Velamuri, 2018. "The gap between self-reported and objective measures of disease status in India," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(8), pages 1-18, August.
    8. Bertha Maya Sopha, 2013. "Sustainable Paper Consumption: Exploring Behavioral Factors," Social Sciences, MDPI, vol. 2(4), pages 1-14, November.

  14. Suziedelyte, Agne, 2012. "How does searching for health information on the Internet affect individuals' demand for health care services?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1828-1835.

    Cited by:

    1. Denzil G. Fiebig, 2017. "Big Data: Will It Improve Patient-Centered Care?," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;International Academy of Health Preference Research, vol. 10(2), pages 133-139, April.
    2. Zhang, Jiaping & Yan, Qing & Guo, Wenxin & Gong, Xiaomei & Cheng, Mingwang & Yu, Ning, 2020. "Rainbow over the Internet: How Internet use curtails homophobia in China," Technology in Society, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    3. Vincenza Capone & Daniela Caso & Anna Rosa Donizzetti & Fortuna Procentese, 2020. "University Student Mental Well-Being during COVID-19 Outbreak: What Are the Relationships between Information Seeking, Perceived Risk and Personal Resources Related to the Academic Context?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(17), pages 1-17, August.
    4. Chen, Lipeng & Liu, Wanlin, 2022. "The effect of Internet access on body weight: Evidence from China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(C).
    5. Christian Schmid, 2013. "Identification of Supplier-induced Demand What kind of consumer information matters?," Diskussionsschriften dp1301, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    6. Dwyer, Debra Sabatini & Liu, Hong, 2013. "The impact of consumer health information on the demand for health services," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-11.
    7. Hiroaki Suenaga & Maria Rosalía Vicente, 2022. "Online and offline health information seeking and the demand for physician services," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 23(3), pages 337-356, April.
    8. Tian, Xiaoli & Zhang, Sai, 2022. "Expert or experiential knowledge? How knowledge informs situated action in childcare practices," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 307(C).
    9. Fuhmei Wang & Jung-Der Wang, 2017. "Telehealth and Sustainable Improvements to Quality of Life," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 12(1), pages 173-184, March.

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This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations, Wikipedia, or ReplicationWiki entries:
  1. Lithuanian Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (6) 2011-02-26 2013-06-16 2013-06-24 2014-11-12 2018-02-26 2021-09-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2013-06-16 2013-06-16
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2014-11-12 2015-02-11
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-06-16
  5. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2015-02-11
  6. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2013-06-24
  7. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (1) 2013-06-16
  8. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2021-09-13
  9. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2021-09-13
  10. NEP-ISF: Islamic Finance (1) 2021-09-13
  11. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2015-02-11
  12. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2015-09-11
  13. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2018-02-26
  14. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2013-06-16
  15. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2014-11-12

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