IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Can Earth system interactions be governed? Governance functions for linking climate change mitigation with land use, freshwater and biodiversity protection

  • Nilsson, Måns
  • Persson, Åsa
Registered author(s):

    Earth system interactions, as highlighted by the planetary boundaries framework, occur within and across natural, social and economic systems and shape global environmental change. This paper addresses the multi-level governance problem of coherently addressing key interactions between four Earth sub-systems – climate change, freshwater use, land use and biodiversity – taking into account concerns over problem shifting. After discussing possibilities for regional downscaling of the boundaries, we explore challenges for the EU region to coherently address this particular set of interacting Earth sub-systems and reduce the risk of problem shifting. This analysis demonstrates that Earth system interactions can be governed, but that they likely require comprehensive packages of governance responses across both sub-systems and levels. Three overarching governance functions are tentatively identified that directly or indirectly address Earth system interactions: reduction of system stress, risks and vulnerabilities; triggering and navigation of transformation of economic activity; and development of a diversity of options. Finally, the paper briefly discusses political and institutional challenges for developing, enabling and stabilising these governance functions.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800911005313
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 75 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 61-71

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:75:y:2012:i:c:p:61-71
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Martin, Philip L., 2007. "Immigration and Agriculture (PowerPoint)," Agricultural Outlook Forum 2007 8037, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Outlook Forum.
    2. Mushtaq, Shahbaz & Maraseni, Tek Narayan & Maroulis, Jerry & Hafeez, Mohsin, 2009. "Energy and water tradeoffs in enhancing food security: A selective international assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3635-3644, September.
    3. Michelsen, Johannes, 2009. "The Europeanization of organic agriculture and conflicts over agricultural policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 252-257, June.
    4. Bergek, Anna & Jacobsson, Staffan & Carlsson, Bo & Lindmark, Sven & Rickne, Annika, 2008. "Analyzing the functional dynamics of technological innovation systems: A scheme of analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 407-429, April.
    5. Gwyn Prins & Isabel Galiana & Christopher Green & Reiner Grundmann & Atte Korhola & Frank Laird & Ted Nordhaus & Roger Pielke Jnr & Steve Rayner & Daniel Sarewitz & Michael Shellenberger & Nico Stehr , 2010. "The Hartwell Paper: a new direction for climate policy after the crash of 2009," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 27939, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Kym Anderson & Will Martin, 2009. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Asia," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2611, April.
    7. Robert Falkner & Hannes Stephan & John Vogler, 2010. "International climate policy after Copenhagen: towards a �building blocks� approach," GRI Working Papers 21, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    8. Frank Biermann & Olwen Davies & Nicolien Grijp, 2009. "Environmental policy integration and the architecture of global environmental governance," International Environmental Agreements- Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 351-369, November.
    9. Underdal, Arild, 1980. "Integrated marine policy : What? Why? How?," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 159-169, July.
    10. Frank Biermann & Philipp Pattberg & Harro van Asselt & Fariborz Zelli, 2009. "The Fragmentation of Global Governance Architectures: A Framework for Analysis," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 9(4), pages 14-40, November.
    11. Barrett, Scott & Toman, Michael, 2010. "Contrasting future paths for an evolving global climate regime," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5164, The World Bank.
    12. Nilsson, Måns & Nilsson, Lars J. & Ericsson, Karin, 2009. "The rise and fall of GO trading in European renewable energy policy: The role of advocacy and policy framing," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4454-4462, November.
    13. Karl Hillman & Måns Nilsson & Annika Rickne & Thomas Magnusson, 2011. "Fostering sustainable technologies: a framework for analysing the governance of innovation systems," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(5), pages 403-415, June.
    14. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott & Martin, William J. & Liu, Yu, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in China," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48478, World Bank.
    15. Steffen, Will & Young, Oran R. & Grove, J. Morgan & Kofinas, Gary P. & Carpenter, Stephen R. & Folke, Carl & Abel, Nick & Olsson, Per & Smith, D. Mark Stafford & Walker, Brian & Berkes, Fikret & Biggs, 2010. "Ecosystem Stewardship: Sustainability Strategies for a Rapidly Changing Planet," Scholarly Articles 9774650, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    16. Måns Nilsson & Marc Pallemaerts & Ingmar Homeyer, 2009. "International regimes and environmental policy integration: introducing the special issue," International Environmental Agreements- Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 337-350, November.
    17. Taishi Sugiyama & Jonathan Sinton, 2005. "Orchestra of Treaties: A Future Climate Regime Scenario with Multiple Treaties among Like-minded Countries," International Environmental Agreements- Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 65-88, 03.
    18. Paavola, Jouni, 2007. "Institutions and environmental governance: A reconceptualization," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 93-103, June.
    19. Julia Hertin & John Turnpenny & Andrew Jordan & Mans Nilsson & Duncan Russel & Björn Nykvist, 2009. "Rationalising the policy mess? Ex ante policy assessment and the utilisation of knowledge in the policy process," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 41(5), pages 1185-1200, May.
    20. Julia Hertin & John Turnpenny & Andrew Jordan & Mans Nilsson & Duncan Russel & Björn Nykvist, 2009. "Rationalising the Policy Mess? Ex Ante Policy Assessment and the Utilisation of Knowledge in the Policy Process," Environment and Planning A, SAGE Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 1185-1200, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:75:y:2012:i:c:p:61-71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamier, Wendy)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.