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Adoption of safer irrigation technologies and cropping patterns: Evidence from Southern Ghana

  • Abdulai, Awudu
  • Owusu, Victor
  • Bakang, John-Eudes A.

The new irrigation technologies introduced in sub-Saharan Africa aim at ensuring safer vegetable production when untreated waste water is used as irrigation water. This paper examines the adoption of safer irrigation technologies and crop choices among vegetable farmers, using cross-section data from urban Kumasi in Ghana. The study employed a two-stage conditional maximum likelihood approach to examine the impact of crop choices and farm-level characteristics on the adoption of safer irrigation technologies. The empirical results indicate that apart from household and farm characteristics such as access to extension agents, belonging to a farmer's organization and education, cropping patterns tend to influence adoption of irrigation technologies for safer vegetable production.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 70 (2011)
Issue (Month): 7 (May)
Pages: 1415-1423

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:70:y:2011:i:7:p:1415-1423
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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