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The Effect of Production Uncertainty and Information Dissemination of the Diffusion of Irrigation Technologies

  • Koundouri, Phoebe
  • Nauges, Céline
  • Tzouvelekas, Vangelis

In this paper we study the diffusion of modern irrigation technologies among a population of farmers, with a particular focus on risk and information dissemination through network and imitation effects. The major contribution of our work is to extend the traditional (theoretical) model of diffusion to account for production risk and the value of information about the new technology. This model is then applied to a sample of 385 farms located in Crete, Greece, to describe diffusion of modern irrigation technologies. Our results indicate that risk aversion plays a significant role and that farmers who are more sensitive to the risk of extreme events will adopt the modern irrigation technology earlier. Knowledge, experience and information dissemination are found to reduce time before adoption of the new technology, while farmers tend to learn more from and/or imitate farmers that are homophylic to them with respect to their education level, age and farm specialization.

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Paper provided by Toulouse School of Economics (TSE) in its series TSE Working Papers with number 09-032.

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Date of creation: Apr 2009
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Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:22145
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  1. Chokri Dridi & Madhu Khanna, 2005. "Irrigation Technology Adoption and Gains from Water Trading under Asymmetric Information," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(2), pages 289-301.
  2. Owens, Trudy & Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2003. "The Impact of Agricultural Extension on Farm Production in Resettlement Areas of Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(2), pages 337-57, January.
  3. Ariel Dinar & Mark Campbell & David Zilberman, 1992. "Adoption of improved irrigation and drainage reduction technologies under limiting environmental conditions," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 2(4), pages 373-398, July.
  4. Sherlund, Shane M. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Adesina, Akinwumi A., 2002. "Smallholder technical efficiency controlling for environmental production conditions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 85-101, October.
  5. Kim, Kwansoo & Chavas, Jean-Paul, 2003. "Technological change and risk management: an application to the economics of corn production," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 29(2), pages 125-142, October.
  6. Karl H. Schlag, 1995. "Why Imitate, and if so, How? A Bounded Rational Approach to Multi-Armed Bandits," Discussion Paper Serie B 361, University of Bonn, Germany, revised Mar 1996.
  7. Smith, Richard J & Blundell, Richard W, 1986. "An Exogeneity Test for a Simultaneous Equation Tobit Model with an Application to Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 679-85, May.
  8. Dinar, Ariel & Yaron, Dan, 1992. "Adoption and abandonment of irrigation technologies," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 6(4), pages 315-332, April.
  9. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1988. "Economic Duration Data and Hazard Functions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 646-79, June.
  10. Jensen, Michael C, 1986. "Agency Costs of Free Cash Flow, Corporate Finance, and Takeovers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 323-29, May.
  11. Dinar, Ariel & Zilberman, David, 1991. "The economics of resource-conservation, pollution-reduction technology selection: The case of irrigation water," Resources and Energy, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 323-348, December.
  12. Schlag, Karl H., 1994. "Why Imitate, and if so, How? Exploring a Model of Social Evolution," Discussion Paper Serie B 296, University of Bonn, Germany.
  13. Dinar, Ariel & Yaron, Dan, 1992. "Adoption and abandonment of irrigation technologies," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 6(4), April.
  14. Abdulai, Awudu & Huffman, Wallace, 2007. "The Diffusion of New Agricultural Technologies: The Case of Crossbreeding Technology in Tanzania," Staff General Research Papers 12785, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  15. Phoebe Koundouri & Céline Nauges & Vangelis Tzouvelekas, 2006. "Technology Adoption under Production Uncertainty: Theory and Application to Irrigation Technology," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 657-670.
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