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Who bears the environmental burden in China--An analysis of the distribution of industrial pollution sources?

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  • Ma, Chunbo

Abstract

A remaining challenge for environmental inequality researchers is to translate the principles developed in the U.S. to China which is experiencing the staggering environmental impacts of its astounding economic growth and social changes. This study builds on U.S. contemporary environmental justice literature and examines the issue of environmental inequality in China through an analysis of the geographical distribution of industrial pollution sources in Henan province. This study attempts to answer two central questions: 1) whether environmental inequality exists in China and if it does, 2) what socioeconomic lenses can be used to identify environmental inequality. The study found that: 1) race and income--the two common lenses used in many U.S. studies play different roles in the Chinese context; 2) rural residents and especially rural migrants are disproportionately exposed to industrial pollution.

Suggested Citation

  • Ma, Chunbo, 2010. "Who bears the environmental burden in China--An analysis of the distribution of industrial pollution sources?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 1869-1876, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:9:p:1869-1876
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Schoolman, Ethan D. & Ma, Chunbo, 2012. "Migration, class and environmental inequality: Exposure to pollution in China's Jiangsu Province," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 140-151.
    2. Andrew Chapman & Timothy Fraser & Melanie Dennis, 2019. "Investigating Ties between Energy Policy and Social Equity Research: A Citation Network Analysis," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(5), pages 1-18, April.
    3. Liu, Ying & Huang, Jikun & Zikhali, Precious, 2016. "The bittersweet fruits of industrialization in rural China: The cost of environment and the benefit from off-farm employment," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-10.
    4. Qi He & Ran Wang & Han Ji & Gaoyang Wei & Jincheng Wang & Jingwen Liu, 2019. "Theoretical Model of Environmental Justice and Environmental Inequality in China’s Four Major Economic Zones," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(21), pages 1-19, October.
    5. Schoolman, Ethan D. & Ma, Chunbo, 2011. "Towards a General Theory of Environmental Inequality: Social Characteristics of Townships and the Distribution of Pollution in China’s Jiangsu Province," Working Papers 117809, University of Western Australia, School of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

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