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Immigrants' Assimilation Process In A Segmented Labor Market

Author

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  • Miguel Angel Alcobendas
  • Núria Rodríquez-Planas

    ()

Abstract

While much of the literature on immigrants' assimilation has focused on countries with a large tradition of receiving immigrants and with flexible labor markets, very little is known on how immigrants adjust to other types of host economies. With its severe dual labor market, and an unprecedented immigration boom, Spain presents a quite unique experience to analyze immigrations' assimilation process. Using data from the 2000 to 2008 Labor Force Survey, we find that immigrants are more occupationally mobile than natives, and that much of this greater flexibility is explained by immigrants' assimilation process soon after arrival. However, we find little evidence of convergence, especially among women and high skilled immigrants. This suggests that instead of integrating, immigrants occupationally segregate, providing evidence consistent with both imperfect substitutability and immigrants' human capital being under-valued. Additional evidence on the assimilation of earnings and the incidence of permanent employment by different skill levels also supports the hypothesis of segmented labor markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Angel Alcobendas & Núria Rodríquez-Planas, 2010. "Immigrants' Assimilation Process In A Segmented Labor Market," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 822.10, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  • Handle: RePEc:aub:autbar:822.10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sara de la Rica & Albretch Glitz & Francesc Ortega, 2013. "Immigration in Europe: Trends, Policies and Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 2013-16, FEDEA.
    2. Hipólito Simón & Raul Ramos & Esteban Sanromá, 2014. "Immigrant Occupational Mobility: Longitudinal Evidence from Spain," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(2), pages 223-255, May.
    3. Jesús Ruiz-Huerta Carbonell & Rosa Martínez, 2014. "Multidimensional poverty in immigrant households: a comparative analysis within the Europe 2020 framework," CIRANO Working Papers 2014s-18, CIRANO.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Key words: immigrants' assimilation effects; cohort effects; and occupational distributions and mobility; segmented labor markets.;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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