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Hurricane watch: Battening down the effects of the storm on local crop production

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  • Spencer, Nekeisha
  • Polachek, Solomon

Abstract

This study utilizes a panel fixed effects model to explore the economic impact of hurricanes on local crop production in Jamaica using quarterly 1999–2008 microlevel data. We find, in general, that hurricanes have a negative impact on production but not for crops grown below ground. The exceptions for underground crops being negatively affected are yams and potatoes for which water saturated soil reduces output. From these results, implications are obtained regarding issues such as food security, export expansion, and earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Spencer, Nekeisha & Polachek, Solomon, 2015. "Hurricane watch: Battening down the effects of the storm on local crop production," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 234-240.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:120:y:2015:i:c:p:234-240
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.10.006
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    1. Israel, Danilo C. & Briones, Roehlano M., 2012. "Impacts of Natural Disasters on Agriculture, Food Security, and Natural Resources and Environment in the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2012-36, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
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    5. Donovan Campbell & Clinton Beckford, 2009. "Negotiating Uncertainty: Jamaican Small Farmers’ Adaptation and Coping Strategies, Before and After Hurricanes—A Case Study of Hurricane Dean," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 1(4), pages 1-22, December.
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    1. repec:eee:wdevel:v:104:y:2018:i:c:p:404-417 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crop production; Exogenous shock; Hurricanes;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture

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