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Wage and price differences, technology gap and labor flow dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Li, Shang-ao
  • Gong, Liutang
  • Pan, Shan
  • Luo, Feng

Abstract

The relationship between wage difference and relative employment is a very important issue in the field of economic structural change. An M-sector economic growth model is constructed in this paper to investigate the relationship between wage difference, price difference, technology gap, relative employment and sectoral dynamic change from the perspective of technologies. Labor flow is regarded as a decision-making behavior to maximize the benefits of economic agents. The benefits of labor flow mainly come from sectoral wage difference, and the costs of labor flow mainly come from the social resource expenditure during labor flow process. Our model illustrates that: (i) the relative employment is positively correlated with the real wage difference and technology gap; (ii) the sectoral dynamic changes coexist with the aggregate economic growth; (iii) increases in technology gap, and price and wage differences will stimulate labor migration, exacerbate the unbalanced growth of sectoral economies, and lead to faster and more effective aggregate economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Shang-ao & Gong, Liutang & Pan, Shan & Luo, Feng, 2020. "Wage and price differences, technology gap and labor flow dynamics," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 211-222.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:88:y:2020:i:c:p:211-222
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2019.09.031
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wage difference; Price difference; Technology gap; Labor flow;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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