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Body and mind: Experimental evidence from women living with HIV

Author

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  • Lubega, Patrick
  • Nakakawa, Frances
  • Narciso, Gaia
  • Newman, Carol
  • Kaaya, Archileo N.
  • Kityo, Cissy
  • Tumuhimbise, Gaston A.

Abstract

How should we support marginalized individuals? By providing nutritional support for their body or by supporting their mind and allowing them to see their potential? This paper explores ways to improve the welfare of women living with HIV, by addressing two obstacles that they face: the body and the mind. We use a randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of three information-focused treatments: a standard nutritional information campaign, cookery demonstrations and role models. We find that providing information on nutrition leads to an improvement in nutritional intake and overall health. Participatory information interventions, such as the cookery demonstrations and exposure to role models, are found to empower and inspire participants to become more ambitious and invest in income-generating activities. As such, these types of interventions have the potential to have longer-term effects on welfare than passive information campaigns.

Suggested Citation

  • Lubega, Patrick & Nakakawa, Frances & Narciso, Gaia & Newman, Carol & Kaaya, Archileo N. & Kityo, Cissy & Tumuhimbise, Gaston A., 2021. "Body and mind: Experimental evidence from women living with HIV," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 150(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:150:y:2021:i:c:s0304387820301887
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2020.102613
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information campaign; Role models; RCT; HIV;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty

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