IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

How connected are Chinese farmers to retail markets? New evidence of price transmission

  • Liu, Bo
  • Keyzer, Michiel
  • van den Boom, Bart
  • Zikhali, Precious

This paper examines the extent to which Chinese farmers are connected to regional agricultural markets by looking at the intensity of price transmission from retail markets to the farmgate. This intensity is indicative of the extent to which farmers might benefit from improved marketing opportunities and be exposed to price risks. We estimate the elasticity of farmgate prices to retail prices using price data for 170 markets, in 29 out of 33 provinces of China, at the detail of 12 main products and for the five-year period 1996 to 2000. In each province we find strong linkages between retail and farmgate prices with elasticities ranging between 0.6 and 1 and intensifying over time. This suggests that Chinese farmers are generally well connected to retail markets and that this connectivity has strengthened in the period considered, creating not only new opportunities but also new risks. It is also found that linkages are relatively weak in inland provinces, which is a point of concern in view of Chinese policies to create equal opportunities and equitable growth.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 23 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 34-46

in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:23:y:2012:i:1:p:34-46
Contact details of provider: Web page:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Wu, Ziping & Merlean, Seamus, 2003. "Market efficiency in the reformed Chinese grain marketing system," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 115-130.
  2. Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle & Min Chang, 2004. "Tracking Distortions in Agriculture: China and Its Accession to the World Trade Organization," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 18(1), pages 59-84.
  3. Wolfgang Keller & Carol H. Shiue, 2007. "Market Integration and Economic Development: A Long-run Comparison," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 107-123, 02.
  4. Alwyn Young, 2000. "The Razor's Edge: Distortions and Incremental Reform in the People's Republic of China," NBER Working Papers 7828, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Park, Albert & Rozelle, Scott & Cai, Fang, 1994. "China's grain policy reforms: Implications for equity, stabilization, and efficiency," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 15-33.
  6. ZY. Zhou & GH. Wan & LB. Chen, 2000. "Integration of rice markets: the case of southern China," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(1), pages 95-106, 01.
  7. Zhuang, Renan & Abbott, Philip, 2007. "Price elasticities of key agricultural commodities in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 155-169.
  8. Kym Anderson & Jikun Huang & Elena Ianchovichina, 2002. "Impact of ChinaÂ’s WTO Accession on Farm-Nonfarm Income Inequality and Rural Poverty," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2002-11, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  9. Alwyn Young, 2000. "The Razor's Edge: Distortions and Incremental Reform in the People's Republic of China," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1091-1135.
  10. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "The emergence of agricultural commodity markets in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 266-280.
  11. Albert Park & Hehui Jin & Scott Rozelle & Jikun Huang, 2002. "Market Emergence and Transition: Arbitrage, Transaction Costs, and Autarky in China's Grain Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(1), pages 67-82.
  12. Cheng, Yuk-shing, 1996. "China's grain marketing system reform in 1993-1994: empirical evidence from a rural household survey," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 135-153.
  13. Awokuse, Titus O., 2007. "Market Reforms, Spatial Price Dynamics, and China's Rice Market Integration: A Causal Analysis with Directed Acyclic Graphs," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 32(01), April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:23:y:2012:i:1:p:34-46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.