IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Hedonic Price Function in a Matching Model of Housing Market


  • Gaetano Lisi

    () (University of Cassino)


This paper develops a theoretical model in which the matching framework à la Pissarides (2000) extended to the housing market is integrated with the hedonic price theory. Market tightness and selling price collectively determine the long-run equilibrium of the economic system in which a seller can become a buyer, and vice versa. As a result, the house price depends not only on the housing characteristics but also on the market tensions and bargaining power of the parties. This integration allows to overcome a major drawback of the hedonic price theory, namely the assumption of perfect competition.

Suggested Citation

  • Gaetano Lisi, 2011. "The Hedonic Price Function in a Matching Model of Housing Market," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(3), pages 2347-2355.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00439

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    2. Genesove, David & Han, Lu, 2012. "Search and matching in the housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 31-45.
    3. James A. Dorn, 2003. "Introduction," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 23(1), pages 1-9, Spring/Su.
    4. Sheppard, Stephen, 1999. "Hedonic analysis of housing markets," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 41, pages 1595-1635 Elsevier.
    5. Jos Janssen & Bert Kruijt & Barrie Needham, 1994. "The Honeycomb Cycle in Real Estate," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 9(2), pages 237-252.
    6. Stephen Malpezzi, "undated". "Hedonic Pricing Models: A Selective and Applied Review," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 02-05, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    7. Brown, Jeff E. & Ethridge, Don E., 1995. "Functional Form Model Specification: An Application To Hedonic Pricing," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 24(2), October.
    8. Epple, Dennis, 1987. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Estimating Demand and Supply Functions for Differentiated Products," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(1), pages 59-80, February.
    9. Cotteleer, Geerte & Gardebroek, Cornelis, 2006. "Bargaining and market power in a GIS-based hedonic pricing model of the agricultural land market," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21255, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Andrew Caplin & John Leahy, 2011. "Trading Frictions and House Price Dynamics," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 283-303, October.
    11. Rosen, Sherwin, 1974. "Hedonic Prices and Implicit Markets: Product Differentiation in Pure Competition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(1), pages 34-55, Jan.-Feb..
    12. John P. Harding & Stuart S. Rosenthal & C. F. Sirmans, 2003. "Estimating Bargaining Power in the Market for Existing Homes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(1), pages 178-188, February.
    13. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
    14. John P. Harding & John R. Knight & C.F. Sirmans, 2003. "Estimating Bargaining Effects in Hedonic Models: Evidence from the Housing Market," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(4), pages 601-622, December.
    15. Brown, Jeff E. & Ethridge, Don E., 1995. "Functional Form Model Specification: An Application to Hedonic Pricing," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(02), pages 166-173, October.
    16. James Albrecht & Axel Anderson & Eric Smith & Susan Vroman, 2007. "Opportunistic Matching In The Housing Market," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 48(2), pages 641-664, May.
    17. Quan, Daniel C & Quigley, John M, 1991. "Price Formation and the Appraisal Function in Real Estate Markets," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 127-146, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Gaetano Lisi, 2013. "Can the Mortensen-Pissarides Model Match the Housing Market Facts?," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 56(2), pages 78-92.
    2. Gaetano Lisi, 2011. "Price Dispersion in the Housing Market: The Role of Bargaining and Search Costs," Working Papers hal-00628323, HAL.
    3. Gaetano Lisi, 2013. "Matching Models and Housing Markets: the Role of the Zero-Profit Condition," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 3(1), pages 54-60, June.
    4. Gaetano Lisi, 2012. "Can the Mortensen-Pissarides Model Match the Housing Market Facts ?," Working Papers hal-00676072, HAL.
    5. Lisi, Gaetano, 2011. "Price dispersion in the housing market: the role of bargaining and search costs," MPRA Paper 33863, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Lisi, Gaetano & Iacobini, Mauro, 2012. "Estimation of a Hedonic House Price Model with Bargaining: Evidence from the Italian Housing Market," MPRA Paper 66474, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    hedonic price theory; housing market; search and matching models;

    JEL classification:

    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • R3 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-11-00439. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.