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Occupational inequalities in health expectancies in France in the early 2000s: Unequal chances of reaching and living retirement in good health

  • Emmanuelle Cambois

    (Institut national d´études démographiques (INED))

  • Caroline Laborde

    (INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale))

  • Isabelle Romieu

    (INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale))

  • Jean-Marie Robine

    (INSERM U988 & U710 - EPHE)

Registered author(s):

    Increasing life expectancy (LE) raises expectations for social participation at later ages. We computed health expectancies (HE) to assess the (un)equal chances of social/work participation after age 50 in the context of France in 2003. We considered five HEs, covering various health situations which can jeopardize participation, and focused on both older ages and the pre-retirement period. HEs reveal large inequalities for both sexes in the chances of remaining healthy after retirement, and also of reaching retirement age in good health and without disability, especially in low-qualified occupations. These results challenge the policy expectation of an overall increase in social participation at later ages.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol25/12/25-12.pdf
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    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 12 (August)
    Pages: 407-436

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:25:y:2011:i:12
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    1. Matthews, Ruth J. & Jagger, Carol & Hancock, Ruth M., 2006. "Does socio-economic advantage lead to a longer, healthier old age?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(10), pages 2489-2499, May.
    2. Agnes Lievre & Nicolas Brouard & Christopher Heathcote, 2003. "The Estimation Of Health Expectancies From Cross-Longitudinal Surveys," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 211-248.
    3. Verbrugge, Lois M. & Jette, Alan M., 1994. "The disablement process," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 1-14, January.
    4. Agree, Emily M., 1999. "The influence of personal care and assistive devices on the measurement of disability," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 427-443, February.
    5. Sirven, Nicolas & Debrand, Thierry, 2008. "Social participation and healthy ageing: An international comparison using SHARE data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(12), pages 2017-2026, December.
    6. Sandy Tubeuf & Florence Jusot & Marion Devaux & Catherine Sermet, 2008. "Social heterogeneity in self-reported health status and measurement of inequalities in health," Working Papers DT12, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jun 2008.
    7. Thomas Barnay, 2010. "In which ways do unhealthy people older than 50 exit the labour market in France?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 127-140, April.
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