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Great War, Civil War, and Recovery: Russia's National Income, 1913 to 1928

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  • Markevich, Andrei
  • Harrison, Mark

Abstract

The last remaining gap in the national accounts of Russia and the USSR in the twentieth century, 1913 to 1928, includes the Great War, the Civil War, and postwar recovery. Filling this gap, we find that the Russian economy did somewhat better in the Great War than was previously thought; in the Civil War it did correspondingly worse; war losses persisted into peacetime, and were not fully restored under the New Economic Policy. We compare this experience across regions and over time. The Great War and Civil War produced the deepest economic trauma of Russia's troubled twentieth century.

Suggested Citation

  • Markevich, Andrei & Harrison, Mark, 2011. "Great War, Civil War, and Recovery: Russia's National Income, 1913 to 1928," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(03), pages 672-703, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:71:y:2011:i:03:p:672-703_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Davis, Kat Kleman & Davis, Jeffrey Sasha & Dowler, Lorraine, 2004. "In motion, out of place: the public space(s) of Tourette Syndrome," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 103-112, July.
    2. S. G. Wheatcroft & R. W. Davies & J. M. Cooper, 1986. "Soviet Industrialization Reconsidered: Some Preliminary Conclusions about Economic Development between 1926 and 1941," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 39(2), pages 264-294, May.
    3. L. N. Litoshenko, 1927. "The National Income of the Soviet Union," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(1), pages 70-93.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harrison, Mark, 2017. "The Soviet Economy, 1917-1991 : Its Life and Afterlife," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1137, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    2. Jutta Bolt & Jan Luiten Zanden, 2014. "The Maddison Project: collaborative research on historical national accounts," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(3), pages 627-651, August.
    3. Miller, Marcus & Smith, Jennifer C., 2015. "In the shadow of the Gulag: Worker discipline under Stalin," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 531-548.
    4. repec:tpr:restat:v:100:y:2018:i:2:p:245-259 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chernina, Eugenia & Castañeda Dower, Paul & Markevich, Andrei, 2014. "Property rights, land liquidity, and internal migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 191-215.
    6. Michel Fouquin & Jules Hugot, 2016. "Two Centuries of Bilateral Trade and Gravity data: 1827-2014," VNIVERSITAS ECONÓMICA 015129, UNIVERSIDAD JAVERIANA - BOGOTÁ.
    7. repec:rnp:ecopol:ep1809 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Anton Cheremukhin & Mikhail Golosov & Sergei Guriev & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2013. "Was Stalin Necessary for Russia's Economic Development?," NBER Working Papers 19425, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. repec:eee:rujoec:v:1:y:2015:i:2:p:130-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Lindert, Peter H. & Nafziger, Steven, 2014. "Russian Inequality on the Eve of Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 767-798, September.
    11. Paul Castaneda Dower & Andrei Markevich, 2013. "Labor Surplus and Mass Mobilization: Russian Agriculture during the Great War," Working Papers w0196, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    12. repec:cge:wacage:2018 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Markevich, Andrei & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2015. "Economic Effects of the Abolition of Serfdom: Evidence from the Russian Empire," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1502, CEPREMAP.
    14. Paul Castañeda Dower & Andrei Markevich, 2018. "Labor Misallocation and Mass Mobilization: Russian Agriculture during the Great War," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(2), pages 245-259, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • N14 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: 1913-
    • N44 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Europe: 1913-
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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