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Soviet growth and American textbooks: An endogenous past

  • Levy, David M.
  • Peart, Sandra J.

Between 1960 and 1980 American economics textbooks overestimated Soviet growth. They held that the Soviet economy was growing faster than the US economy and yet they kept the ratio of Soviet–US output constant over two decades. The textbooks downplayed any uncertainty associated with such growth estimates. We offer evidence that the optimistic portrait of the Soviet economy in the textbooks was in part driven by an assumption of efficiency and abstraction from institutional concerns.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268111000114
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 78 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 110-125

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:78:y:2011:i:1:p:110-125
DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2010.12.012
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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  18. repec:ecr:col093:29104 is not listed on IDEAS
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