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The fragility of a discipline when a model has monopoly status

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  • David Levy

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  • Sandra Peart

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Abstract

We consider the consequences of a scientific literature with only one model of an important phenomenon. The falsification of the model would mean falsification of the science. Scientists who would prefer not to have their discipline falsified will be tempted to find ad hoc explanations to excuse the failure. To test this hypothesis we propose a study of the economic forecasts of the comparative Soviet and American growth rates in the years before a public choice model of central planning was a viable alternative to the public interest model. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Suggested Citation

  • David Levy & Sandra Peart, 2006. "The fragility of a discipline when a model has monopoly status," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 125-136, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revaec:v:19:y:2006:i:2:p:125-136
    DOI: 10.1007/s11138-006-7344-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sally, David, 2001. "On sympathy and games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 1-30, January.
    2. Denton, Frank T, 1985. "Data Mining as an Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 124-127, February.
    3. Kevin McCabe & Elizabeth Hoffman & Vernon L. Smith, 1999. "Social Distance and Other-Regarding Behavior in Dictator Games: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 340-341, March.
    4. Rubinstein,Ariel, 2000. "Economics and Language," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521789905, April.
    5. G. Warren Nutter & Israel Borenstein & Adam Kaufman, 1962. "Growth of Industrial Production in the Soviet Union," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number nutt62-1, June.
    6. Andrei Shleifer & Robert Vishny, 1992. "Pervasive Shortages under Socialism," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 23(2), pages 237-246, Summer.
    7. Colin F. Camerer & Richard H. Thaler, 1995. "Anomalies: Ultimatums, Dictators and Manners," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 209-219, Spring.
    8. Andrew Farrant, 2004. "Frank Knight, Worst-Case Theorizing, and Economic Planning: Socialism as Monopoly Politics," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 497-504, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. Roger Koppl & William Luther, 2012. "Hayek, Keynes, and modern macroeconomics," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 223-241, September.
    2. Levy, David M. & Peart, Sandra J., 2011. "Soviet growth and American textbooks: An endogenous past," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 110-125.
    3. David Levy & Sandra Peart, 2015. "G. Warren Nutter’s “Traveler’s tale of the Soviet economy”: A witness to the actual world," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 397-404, December.

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