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Poverty and Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: Literature Survey and Empirical Assessment

  • Delfin Go

    (Africa Department, the World Bank)

  • Denis Nikitin

    (Development Research Group, the World Bank)

  • Xiongjian Wang

    (CEMA, Central University)

  • Heng-fu Zou

    (CEMA, Central University
    IAS, Wuhan University
    Peking University
    Development Research Group, the World Bank)

This paper surveys the literature and assesses the magnitude, persistence, and depth of poverty and inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa using empirical analysis. Our analysis explores linkages between three key facts about development in Sub-Saharan Africa: poor economic growth, poor performance in terms of public health indicators, and resilient high-income inequality. Most of the differential between growth rates in Sub-Saharan Africa and other developing countries can be explained by two measures of human capital-secondary enrolment and infant mortality. We also find that the growth trend in Sub-Saharan Africa does not significantly differ from other developing countries that have fallen into a poverty trap.

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Article provided by Society for AEF in its journal Annals of Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 8 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 251-304

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Handle: RePEc:cuf:journl:y:2007:v:8:i:2:p:251-304
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