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Experiential Learning with Experiments

Author

Listed:
  • Henrik Egbert

    () (Anhalt University of Applied Sciences)

  • Vanessa Mertins

    () (Trier University)

Abstract

This paper discusses the implementation of experiential learning techniques in a behavioural economics class. In order to deepen students' understanding of both behavioural economics and the experimental approach to research students in the course developed and conducted variants of economic experiments. We believe that the process of designing and implementing the experiments fostered a better understanding of the material than simply participating in classroom experiments would have done. Students worked in small groups to develop their versions of the experiments. Thus, the complete process promoted genuine active learning by engaging the students both individually and collectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Henrik Egbert & Vanessa Mertins, 2010. "Experiential Learning with Experiments," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 9(2), pages 59-66.
  • Handle: RePEc:che:ireepp:v:9:y:2010:i:2:p:59-66
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    File URL: http://www.economicsnetwork.ac.uk/iree/v9n2/egbert.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joseph Henrich, 2001. "In Search of Homo Economicus: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 73-78, May.
    2. Michael Watts & William E. Becker, 2008. "A Little More than Chalk and Talk: Results from a Third National Survey of Teaching Methods in Undergraduate Economics Courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 273-286, July.
    3. Roth, Alvin E. & Vesna Prasnikar & Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara & Shmuel Zamir, 1991. "Bargaining and Market Behavior in Jerusalem, Ljubljana, Pittsburgh, and Tokyo: An Experimental Study," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1068-1095, December.
    4. Bouckaert, Jan & Dhaene, Geert, 2004. "Inter-ethnic trust and reciprocity: results of an experiment with small businessmen," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 869-886, November.
    5. Nancy Buchan & Rachel Croson, 1999. "Gender and Culture: International Experimental Evidence from Trust Games," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 386-391, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Raboy, David G., 2017. "An introductory microeconomics in-class experiment to reinforce the marginal utility/price maximization rule and the integration of modern theory," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 36-49.
    2. Bosley, Stacie, 2016. "Student-crafted experiments “from the ground up”," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 1-7.

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