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Student-crafted experiments “from the ground up”

Listed author(s):
  • Bosley, Stacie
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    If experiential learning activities support engagement and deeper student learning, student-owned experiments constructed “from the ground up” might have benefits that exceed pre-designed classroom experiences. This paper provides a framework for embedding a custom experiment project within an existing course. Students manage every aspect of the process, from experimental design to analysis. Two example implementations are described. Undergraduate behavioral economics students created original experiments, exploring anchoring and adjustment in the context of pyramid scheme pitches (in spring 2013) and reciprocity in attraction (in fall 2014). Perceived benefits and potential pitfalls are explored. While this paper does not represent a controlled study of student learning or engagement, both student reflection and instructor observation support the continued use of this pedagogical approach.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1477388015302462
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Economics Education.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 1-7

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ireced:v:22:y:2016:i:c:p:1-7
    DOI: 10.1016/j.iree.2016.02.001
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/international-review-of-economics-education

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