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Multidimensional tests for economic behavior differences across cultures

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  • Ehmke, Mariah
  • Lusk, Jayson
  • Tyner, Wallace

Abstract

We investigate whether cultural differences exist across a broader set of economic behaviors than previously tested. A variety of cultural dimensions of economic relevance were identified based on anthropological and sociological literatures. Experiments were constructed to measure these dimensions in an economic context. Data were collected in China, France, Niger, and two locations in the United States. Data analysis reveals significant differences across countries in all types of economic behavior considered, suggesting strong cultural influences on multiple types of economic behavior and preferences. When making pair-wise group comparisons we see certain patterns of similarity arising across locations for specific types of behavior. Only the two United States locations share nearly identical behavior across experiments. Other locations may share similar strategic behavior to each other, but dissimilar individual economic preferences or vice versa.

Suggested Citation

  • Ehmke, Mariah & Lusk, Jayson & Tyner, Wallace, 2010. "Multidimensional tests for economic behavior differences across cultures," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 37-45, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:39:y:2010:i:1:p:37-45
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Filippin & Paolo Crosetto, 2016. "A Reconsideration of Gender Differences in Risk Attitudes," Management Science, INFORMS, pages 3138-3160.
    2. Morawetz, Ulrich B. & De Groote, Hugo & Kimenju, Simon Chege, 2011. "Improving the Use of Experimental Auctions in Africa: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 36(2), August.
    3. Paolo Crosetto & Antonio Filippin & Janna Heider, 2015. "A Study of Outcome Reporting Bias Using Gender Differences in Risk Attitudes," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, pages 239-262.
    4. Sundar, B. & Virmani, Vineet, 2013. "“Impatience” of Forest Dependent Communities - Evidence from Andhra Pradesh," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-12-02, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    5. Sundar, B. & Virmani, Vineet, 2013. "Attitudes towards Risk of Forest Dependent Communities - Evidence from Andhra Pradesh," IIMA Working Papers WP2013-12-01, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.

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