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Voluntary Participation and Spite in Public Good Provision Experiments: an International Comparison

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  • Cason, T.N.
  • Saijo, T.
  • Yamato, T.

Abstract

This paper studies public good provision in the laboratory using the voluntary contribution mechanism, in a cross-cultural experiment conducted in the United States and Japan. Our environment differs from the standard voluntary contribution mechanism because in one treatment, subjects first decide whether or not to participate in providing this public good. This participation decision is conveyed to the other subject prior to the subjects' contribution decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Cason, T.N. & Saijo, T. & Yamato, T., 1998. "Voluntary Participation and Spite in Public Good Provision Experiments: an International Comparison," Papers 98-002, Purdue University, Krannert School of Management - Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER).
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:purkib:98-002
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    EXPERIMENTS ; PUBLIC GOODS ; TESTING;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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