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Evolutionary Theories in Law and Economics and Their Use for Comparative Legal Theory

Listed author(s):
  • von Wangenheim Georg

    (University of Kassel)

Registered author(s):

    Evolutionary Law and Economics explains how law evolves in possibly path dependent ways. The theory therefore seems apt to help comparative legal theory in understanding and evaluating legal variation across jurisdictions. This paper reviews evolutionary approaches in Law and Economics to study in a more precise way whether and how different strands of the approach may be useful for the comparative lawyer.

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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Review of Law & Economics.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (December)
    Pages: 737-765

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:rlecon:v:7:y:2011:i:3:n:5
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