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The Effects of Oklahoma's Pre-K Program on Hispanic Children

Author

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  • William T. Gormley

Abstract

The objective of this work is to determine how much Hispanics benefit from a high-quality pre-K program and which Hispanic students benefit the most. Copyright (c) 2008 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • William T. Gormley, 2008. "The Effects of Oklahoma's Pre-K Program on Hispanic Children," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 89(4), pages 916-936.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:89:y:2008:i:4:p:916-936
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1540-6237.2008.00591.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1999. "Does Head Start help hispanic children?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 235-262, November.
    2. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Does Head Start Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 341-364, June.
    3. Eliana Garces & Duncan Thomas & Janet Currie, 2002. "Longer-Term Effects of Head Start," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 999-1012, September.
    4. William T. Gormley Jr., 2007. "Early childhood care and education: Lessons and puzzles," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 633-671.
    5. Katherine Magnuson & Claudia Lahaie & Jane Waldfogel, 2006. "Preschool and School Readiness of Children of Immigrants," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 87(s1), pages 1241-1262.
    6. Loeb, Susanna & Bridges, Margaret & Bassok, Daphna & Fuller, Bruce & Rumberger, Russell W., 2007. "How much is too much? The influence of preschool centers on children's social and cognitive development," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 52-66, February.
    7. Magnuson, Katherine A. & Ruhm, Christopher & Waldfogel, Jane, 2007. "Does prekindergarten improve school preparation and performance?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 33-51, February.
    8. Katherine Magnuson & Claudia Lahaie & Jane Waldfogel, 2006. "Preschool and School Readiness of Children of Immigrants," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1241-1262.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Johnson, Anna D. & Padilla, Christina M. & Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth, 2017. "Predictors of public early care and education use among children of low-income immigrants," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 24-36.
    2. Daniela Del Boca, 2015. "Child Care Arrangements and Labor Supply," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 88074, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Kim, Sunha & Chang, Mido & Kim, Heejung, 2011. "Does teacher educational training help the early math skills of English language learners in Head Start?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 732-740, May.
    4. De Paola, Maria & Brunello, Giorgio, 2016. "Education as a Tool for the Economic Integration of Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 9836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:bla:jorssa:v:180:y:2017:i:2:p:475-502 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Felfe, Christina & Huber, Martin, 2015. "Does preschool boost the development of minority children? The case of Roma children," FSES Working Papers 455, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    7. Rossin, Maya, 2011. "The effects of maternity leave on children's birth and infant health outcomes in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 221-239, March.
    8. Ylenia Brilli & Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini, 2013. "Child Care Arrangements: Determinants and Consequences," CHILD Working Papers Series 18, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.

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