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Knowledge Accumulation, And Productivity: Evidence From Plant-Level Data For Ireland


  • Mark Cassidy
  • Holger Görg
  • Eric Strobl


This paper investigates whether knowledge accumulating activities, such as exporting, R&D, or worker training, can enhance plants' productivity. To this end, we use plant-level panel data for Irish manufacturing. Our results importantly indicate that productivity enhancing effects of these factors are found only for domestic firms, but not for foreign multinationals located in Ireland. We postulate a number of potential reasons inherent to multinational activity possibly driving this result. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

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  • Mark Cassidy & Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2005. "Knowledge Accumulation, And Productivity: Evidence From Plant-Level Data For Ireland," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(3), pages 344-358, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:3:p:344-358

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Regibeau Pierre M & Rockett Katharine E, 2006. "Administrative Delays as Barriers to Trade," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-47, September.
    2. Brainard, S. Lael & Martimort, David, 1997. "Strategic trade policy with incompletely informed policymakers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 33-65, February.
    3. Paul Levine & Fotis Mouzakis & Ron Smith, 2000. "Arms export controls and emerging domestic producers," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 505-531.
    4. Brander, James A. & Spencer, Barbara J., 1985. "Export subsidies and international market share rivalry," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1-2), pages 83-100, February.
    5. Levine, Paul & Smith, Ron, 2000. "The Arms Trade Game: From Laissez-Faire to a Common Defence Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 357-380, April.
    6. Anton, James J. & Gertler, Paul J., 1988. "External markets and regulation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 243-260, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley, 2011. "Services Outsourcing And Innovation: An Empirical Investigation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 321-333, April.
    2. Love, James H. & Roper, Stephen & Du, Jun, 2009. "Innovation, ownership and profitability," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 424-434, May.
    3. Preeya Mohan & Eric Strobl & Patrick Watson, 2017. "In-Firm Training, Innovation and Productivity: The Case of Caribbean Small Island Developing States," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8216, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Schmidt, Gabriela & Trofimenko, Natalia, 2010. "Linkages between technology choice and exporting: Evidence from Argentina," Kiel Working Papers 1620, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Sourafel Girma & Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley, 2008. "R&D and Exporting: A Comparison of British and Irish Firms," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 144(4), pages 750-773, December.
    6. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2013. "R&D, knowledge, economic growth and the transatlantic productivity gap," Chapters,in: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 11, pages 271-302 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Preeya Mohan & Eric Strobl & Patrick Watson, 2017. "In-Firm Training, Innovation and Productivity: The Case of Caribbean Small Island Developing States," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 98136, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Jian Hou & Heng Chen & Jianzhong Xu, 2017. "External Knowledge Sourcing and Green Innovation Growth with Environmental and Energy Regulations: Evidence from Manufacturing in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-17, February.
    9. Krishnan, Murugappa (Murgie) & Srinivasan, Ashok, 2007. "How do shop-floor supervisors allocate their time?," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 97-115, January.
    10. Holger Görg & Aoife Hanley, "undated". "International Services Outsourcing and Innovation: An Empirical Investigation," Discussion Papers 07/43, University of Nottingham, GEP.

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