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What's Causing Overreaction? An Experimental Investigation of Recency and the Hot-hand Effect


  • Theo Offerman
  • Joep Sonnemans


A substantial body of empirical literature provides evidence of overreaction in markets. Past losers outperform past winners in stock markets as well as in sports markets. Two hypotheses are consistent with this observation. The recency hypothesis states that traders overweight recent information; they are too optimistic about winners and too pessimistic about losers. According to the hot-hand hypothesis, traders try to discover trends in the past record of a firm or a team, and thereby overestimate the autocorrelation in the series. An experimental design allows us to distinguish between these hypotheses. The evidence is consistent with the hot-hand hypothesis. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics", 2004 .

Suggested Citation

  • Theo Offerman & Joep Sonnemans, 2004. "What's Causing Overreaction? An Experimental Investigation of Recency and the Hot-hand Effect," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(3), pages 533-554, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:106:y:2004:i:3:p:533-554

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. J. A. Mirrlees, 1971. "An Exploration in the Theory of Optimum Income Taxation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(2), pages 175-208.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlson, Kurt A. & Shu, Suzanne B., 2007. "The rule of three: How the third event signals the emergence of a streak," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 113-121, September.
    2. Duttle, Kai, 2015. "Disentangling two causes of biased probability judgment: Cognitive skills and perception of randomness," Ruhr Economic Papers 568, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Francisco Galarza, 2010. "Experimentos de campo en economía: preferencias en relación al riesgo y demanda por contratos intertemporales en el Perú," Apuntes. Revista de ciencias sociales, Fondo Editorial, Universidad del Pacífico, vol. 37(66), pages 5-27.
    4. Offerman, Theo & Schotter, Andrew, 2009. "Imitation and luck: An experimental study on social sampling," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 461-502, March.
    5. Silvia Bou & Jordi Brandts & Magda Cayón & Pablo Guillén, 2016. "The price of luck: paying for the hot hand of others," Journal of the Economic Science Association, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 2(1), pages 60-72, May.
    6. Sigrid Suetens & Claus B. Galbo-Jørgensen & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2016. "Predicting Lotto Numbers: A Natural Experiment On The Gambler'S Fallacy And The Hot-Hand Fallacy," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 584-607, June.
    7. Galarza, Francisco, 2009. "Risk, Credit, and Insurance in Peru: Field Experimental Evidence," MPRA Paper 17833, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sabrina Hammiche & Laurent Denant-Boemont, 2008. "Que vaut la flexibilité des choix individuels de transport ? Une étude de cas expérimental," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 182(1), pages 97-111.
    9. Morris, Michael W. & Sheldon, Oliver J. & Ames, Daniel R. & Young, Maia J, 2007. "Metaphors and the market: Consequences and preconditions of agent and object metaphors in stock market commentary," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 174-192, March.
    10. Holt, Charles A. & Smith, Angela M., 2009. "An update on Bayesian updating," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 125-134, February.
    11. Sigrid Møyner Hohle & Karl Halvor Teigen, 2015. "Forecasting forecasts: The trend effect," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(5), pages 416-428, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior


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